You are hereRacism within the Montgomery County Ohio Sheriff's Office

Racism within the Montgomery County Ohio Sheriff's Office


Employee

Captain Thomas Flanders - PSN 387 - Jail Division
Detective Michael Sollenberger - PSN 321 - Administrative Services
Sergeant Brian Lewis - PSN 823 - Community Services
Deputy Jayme Horton - PSN 243 - Jail Division
Deputy Joseph Connelly - PSN 1149 - Community Services
Detective Brad Daugherty - PSN 354 - Community Services

Complainant

Mr. Derrick Foward
Dayton Unit NAACP
1528 West Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Way
Dayton, Ohio 45402
937-222-2172

Synopsis

It is alleged between November of 2011, and January of 2013, Detective Michael Sollenberger exchanged text messages with Captain Thomas Flanders, Sergeant Brian Lewis, Deputy Joseph Connelly, Deputy Jayme Horton and Detective Brad Daugherty. These text messages were allegedly archived by unknown person or persons by printing them out to paper. The unknown person then provided the printed messages to Mr. Derrick Foward, President of the Dayton chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in August of 2014. Mr. Foward lodged a complaint on behalf of the citizens of Montgomery County against the deputies participating in the text conversations due, to the allegedly derogatory and threatening comments contained in the messages.

Investigation

On Saturday, November 29, 2014, Mr. Derick Foward, President of the Dayton Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), contacted Major Daryl Wilson and Sheriff Phil Plummer requesting a meeting regarding a series of text messages he was provided by an individual who wished to remain anonymous. Mr. Foward advised the text messages were reported as being between several members of the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office and contained derogatory jokes and threats to the African American community in Dayton, as well as others.

On Sunday, November 30, 2014, Sheriff Plummer and Major Wilson met with Mr. Foward at the Dayton Offices of the NAACP where Mr. Foward reviewed the messages with Sheriff Plummer and Major Wilson. Mr. Foward explained that he received the messages and met with the complainant sometime in August of 2014, and had sent the messages to the National Offices of the NAACP for review, guidance, and investigation. Mr. Foward advised Sheriff Plummer he could not provide copies of the text messages at that time but would within the next couple of days.

On Sunday, November 30, 2014, Sheriff Plummer contacted me with the information about the allegations and assigned the investigation to me. On Monday, December 1, 2014, Captain Flanders and Detective Sollenberger were placed on Administrative Leave. (see Personnel Order 14-081)

On Tuesday, December 2, 2014, Mr. Foward provided Major Wilson with 105 copied pages of text messages. The text messages appear to be "screen shots" (photographs taken with a smart phone device of the screen displaying the text) from a smart phone device with which the text messages were transferred to a running list of text messages between sender and receiver. There are no names attached to the individual messages; however, the names of the sender and receiver were provided by Mr. Foward, as were reported to him by the anonymous complainant. Mr. Foward said all of the messages are messages between Detective Sollenberger and other Sheriff's Office employees. Major Wilson wrote the name of the individual reportedly participating in the series of text conversations with Detective Sollenberger at the top of the first page of each group of texts. There are some time stamps showing date and time visible in the copies. However, there are others, due to the poor quality of some of the copies, that are not legible.

I reviewed the documents Mr. Foward provided. The documents all appear to be in the same format with one sender of the text messages on the left side of the page and the other on the right side of the page. Throughout all of the documents, Detective Sollenberger's messages appear on the right side of the page. The original documents provided by Mr. Foward are attached to this report.

On Friday, December 5, 2014, Detective Brian Cavender was temporarily assigned to the Inspectional Services Unit to assist with this investigation. I assigned Detective Cavender the task of independently authenticating as many of the individual messages as possible.

Additional Investigation: Detective Bryan Cavender

While investigating this complaint, I started by authenticating as many of the messages as I could. I started by verifying events talked about in the text messages.

One such incident that was talked about between Captain Flanders and Detective Sollenberger was a fight that occurred at Central State University. The text is dated May 02, 2012; the WHIO website news article is April 29, 2012, which has the words "Uninvited guests." (See attached document)

Another text I attempted to authenticate was dated January 16, 2012, in which Detective Sollenberger talked with Captain Flanders about a TV show, iCarly. The conversation was about Michelle Obama appearing on the show. I was able to verify the episode in which Michelle Obama appeared was the same day the text conversation occurred. (See attached document)

A text message dated May 07, 2012, from Detective Sollenberger to Captain Flanders talked about a group that refused to pay gratuity. I found the news article Detective Sollenberger was referring to, and it was dated May 03, 2012. (See attached document)

A text message dated November 08, 2012, from Captain Flanders to Detective Sollenberger talked about Sheriff Gene Kelly. I located a news article dated November 08, 2012, about Sheriff Gene Kelly and Sheriff Office employees regarding an incident that occurred at Stone Crossing Apartments. This news article was also dated November 08, 2012. (See attached document)

I attempted to authenticate the text messages that referred to work incidents. On April 5, 2012, Detective Sollenberger sent Captain Flanders a text message referring to Deputy Haas being involved in an accident. This message was authenticated with call number 120960007. (See attached document)

A text message dated May 19, 2012, referring Captain Flanders standing by with Trotwood Police Department (this incident was a SWAT call out) was authenticated with call number 121400897. (See attached document)

A text message from Detective Sollenberger to Captain Flanders dated December 06, 2012, referred to Captain Flanders at Phase 2 training. I authenticated this message by obtaining a copy of Captain Flander's In-Service Training Record with the same date. (See attached document)

Additional Investigation: Sergeant Parin

On Friday, December 5, 2014, and Saturday, December 6, 2014, I reviewed the digital documents stored on Detective Sollenberger's and Captain Flanders' Sheriff's Office profiles and Sheriff's Office e-mail accounts. I did not find any e-mail messages, electronic files, photos or videos of a derogatory nature based on race, ethnicity, creed or gender. All files were professional and related to their individual work assignments.

On Tuesday, December 9, 2014, I served Captain Flanders, Sergeant Lewis, Detective Sollenberger, Detective Daugherty, Deputy Horton and Deputy Connelly with Notice of Investigation and Notice and Order to Appear forms, along with copies of the text messages each reportedly sent.

On Monday, December 15, 2014, Mr. Foward provided Major Wilson with five digital PDF files representing the entire text messages provided to Mr. Foward by his complainant. I reviewed all of the documents, which include all of the documents Mr. Foward originally provided on Tuesday, December 2, 2014. I reviewed the new documents and compared them to the original documents I received. Due to the service of the original "complaint" documents, the focus of this investigation will remain on the original text messages highlighted by Mr. Foward. I made the following observations based on the review of those documents:

The text message conversations Detective Daugherty reportedly had with Detective Sollenberger occurred between the dates of September 20, 2011, and December 23, 2013. The original documents provided by Mr. Foward contain 14 messages written by Detective Daugherty and 14 messages written by Detective Sollenberger. In the full documents, there are 31 messages written by Detective Daugherty and 31 messages written by Detective Sollenberger. Of the messages sent between the two, there was one message Mr. Foward was concerned with, due to a racially derogatory comment. Detective Sollenberger's comments are in blue and Detective Daugherty's response is gray:

The text message conversations Sergeant Lewis reportedly had with Detective Sollenberger occurred between the dates of December 28, 2011, and January 23, 2013. The original documents provided by Mr. Foward contain 37 messages written by Sergeant Lewis and 30 messages written by Detective Sollenberger. In the full documents, there are 1 04 messages written by Sergeant Lewis and 80 written by Detective Sollenberger. Of the messages sent between the two, there was one series of messages Mr. Foward was concerned with, due to racially derogatory comments. Detective Sollenberger's comments are in blue and Sergeant Lewis' comments are gray:

The text message conversations Deputy Horton reportedly had with Detective Sollenberger occurred between the dates of September 21, 2012, and January 29, 2013. The original documents provided by Mr. Foward contain 36 messages written by Deputy Horton and 44 messages written by Detective Sollenberger. In the full documents, there are 122 messages written by Deputy Horton and 143 written by Detective Sollenberger. Of the messages sent between the two, there was a series of seven messages Mr. Foward was concerned with, due to potentially racially derogatory comments. Detective Sollenberger's comments are in green and Deputy Horton's comments are gray:

The text message conversations Deputy Connelly reportedly had with Detective Sollenberger occurred between the dates of September 20, 2012, and January 30, 2013. The original documents provided by Mr. Foward contain 86 messages written by Deputy Connelly and 82 messages written by Detective Sollenberger. In the full documents, there are 369 messages written by Deputy Connelly and 353 written by Detective Sollenberger. Of the messages sent between the two, there was a series of six messages Mr. Foward was concerned with, due to potentially racially derogatory comments and threats against individuals. Detective Sollenberger's comments are in blue and Deputy Connelly's comments are gray:

The text message conversations Captain Flanders reportedly had with Detective Sollenberger occurred between the dates of November 7, 20I1, and January 3I, 2013. The original documents provided by Mr. Foward contain 293 messages written by Captain Flanders and 291 messages written by Detective Sollenberger. In the full documents, there are approximately 1,641 messages written by Captain Flanders and approximately 1,637 written by Detective Sollenberger. Of the messages sent between the two, there was a series of twenty-nine messages Mr. Foward was concerned with due, to potentially racially derogatory comments or conversations that are inappropriate. Detective Sollenberger's comments are in green and Captain Flanders' comments are gray:

Interview with Ms. Jennifer Sollenberger

On Tuesday, December 16, 2014, at approximately 1055 hours, Ms. Jennifer (Jenn) Sollenberger appeared at the Inspectional Services Unit for an administrative interview. Ms. Sollenberger, Detective Bryan Cavender and I were present for the recorded interview.

Ms. Sollenberger was married to Detective Michael Sollenberger at the time of the interview. Ms. Sollenberger advised they were currently awaiting final results of their divorce trial from the Montgomery County Domestic Relations Court.

Ms. Sollenberger advised she provided a series of text messages to the Dayton Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in early August of2014. Ms. Sollenberger reviewed the documents I received from Mr. Derrick Foward on December 2, 2014, and advised they represented the same documents she gave Mr. Foward.

Ms. Sollenberger said she discovered the text messages the first week of May 2014. Ms. Sollenberger said during the first week of May, her daughter and son were staying with her, and while they were watching television, she noticed her son, [CHILD NAME REDACTED], had left the room for several minutes. Ms. Sollenberger said she looked for [CHILD] and found him in her room looking through her dresser drawers. Ms. Sollenberger said she questioned her son about what he was doing, and after some time, he told her he was looking for his dad's, Detective Michael Sollenberger's, old cellular telephone. Ms. Sollenberger said [CHILD] told her Detective Sollenberger would activate the phone for him [CHILD] if he found it and brought it to him.

Ms. Sollenberger said she knew where the phone was when [CHILD] was looking for it because she had put it away after Detective Sollenberger moved out of the house. Ms. Sollenberger said she had two of her friends stop in to check on her later that night and, after a while, she told them about [CHILD] trying to find Detective Sollenberger's old phone. Ms. Sollenberger said she was upset Detective Sollenberger had their son searching through her room trying to find an old phone. Ms. Sollenberger said as she spoke to her friends, they thought there might be something on the phone Detective Sollenberger did not want her to see. Ms. Sollenberger said one of her friends, Dani, took the phone that night and called her the next day to tell her what she found on the phone.

Ms. Sollenberger said Dani brought a computer with her and showed Ms. Sollenberger what was on the telephone. Ms. Sollenberger said there were nude pictures of Detective Sollenberger and Detective Sollenberger's girlfriend. Ms. Sollenberger said it appeared some of the photographs were taken inside the house she and Detective Sollenberger lived in before they separated, and some appeared to have been taken in a hotel.

Ms. Sollenberger said the next day her friend started reading the text messages on the telephone. Ms. Sollenberger said she did not read all of the messages but found a number of them to be disturbing.

Ms. Sollenberger said she was particularly disturbed by the text messages where there appeared to be enjoyment talking about someone who was murdered, beating up coloreds, and stabbing a coon. Ms. Sollenberger said she had no doubt Detective Sollenberger sent the text messages. Ms. Sollenberger said she knows all of the individuals Detective Sollenberger was texting back and forth with. Ms. Sollenberger said the text messages were between Detective Sollenberger and Captain Thomas Flanders, Sergeant Brian Lewis, Detective Brad Daugherty, Deputy Jayme Horton, and Deputy Joseph Connelly. Ms. Sollenberger said she had no doubts the messages were actually text messages sent between Detective Sollenberger and the other Sheriff's Office employees.

Ms. Sollenberger said the telephone was Detective Sollenberger's personal phone which he used for work purposes, and he claimed the costs of the phone on his taxes as a work expenditure.

Ms. Sollenberger said she gave the NAACP five PDFs containing the text messages on a flash drive. Ms. Sollenberger said she spoke to an investigator with the NAACP, who told her the NAACP would file a complaint with the Department of Justice on her behalf. Ms. Sollenberger said she did not influence or request when the NAACP released the information to the Sheriff's Office.

I asked Ms. Sollenberger who downloaded the information from Detective Sollenberger's phone for her. Ms. Sollenberger said she wanted to speak to the individual before she provided us with the information. Ms. Sollenberger said she would contact the individual and then speak to us again.

Ms. Sollenberger said she did not have any additional information regarding this investigation. I ended the interview at 1113 hours.

Interview with Detective Brad Daugherty

On Thursday, December 18, 2014, at 0928 hours, Detective Brad Daugherty appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriff's Headquarters Building as a focus in an administrative investigation. Detective Daugherty, his representative Mr. Mark Scranton, Detective Bryan Cavender and I were present for the interview. I reviewed the Policy/Waiver form and the Administrative Investigation Pre-Interview form with Detective Daugherty. Detective Daugherty said he understood the forms and signed both. Mr. Scranton and I witnessed his signature on the forms.

Detective Daugherty has been employed by the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for over sixteen years. Detective Daugherty has been a detective for ten years. Detective Daugherty is currently assigned to the Dayton Police Department's Homicide Squad.

Before starting the interview, Detective Daugherty and Mr. Scranton had the opportunity to review the text messages provided to the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office, which are reported as being a series of text conversations between Detective Daugherty and Detective Sollenberger. I asked Detective Daugherty, after reviewing the text messages between him and Detective Sollenberger, if they were in fact conversations he had with Detective Sollenberger. Detective Daugherty said after reviewing the messages, he is sure they were actual text messages sent between him and Detective Sollenberger, based on the content of the messages.

Detective Daugherty said he does not recall sending or receiving the specific messages but the content, for instance the messages talking about a robbery occurring at the Drexel Drive Thru, could only have been between him and Detective Sollenberger. Detective Daugherty explained he was assigned the case of the robbery at that time. Additionally, Detective Daugherty said there is a conversation about a cold case homicide where he and Detective Rick Ward (Detective Ward at the time of the investigation was an employee of the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office and has since resigned to take a job as an investigator with the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation BCI) interviewed an individual in St. Louis, Missouri regarding the homicide.

Detective Daugherty said the text messages in this investigation were sent and received on his personal cell phone. Detective Daugherty explained he had a personal iPhone at the time, which he carried with him, as well as the "flip phone" that was issued to him by the Sheriff's Office to use during the course of his duties. Detective Daugherty said he typically texted with his personal phone because the phone issued by the Sheriff's Office was difficult to send text messages on, due to the number only keypad.

Detective Daugherty said he believed the messages were sent to Detective Sollenberger's personal cell phone also because he believed Detective Sollenberger did not use the cellular telephone issued by the Sheriff's Office, but he had the calls forwarded to his personal cell phone.

I reviewed the text messages with Detective Daugherty. Detective Daugherty identified the text messages printed on the left side of the pages as being messages he texted and the messages printed on the right side of the page as being messages created by Detective Sollenberger.

I reviewed with Detective Daugherty the message:

I asked Detective Daugherty if this was the Drexel robbery he was assigned to investigate. Deceptive Daugherty said, "Yeah, we had a, a drive-thru robbed in Drexel around that time, and the clerk actually pulled a gun on the robber, and the robber shot the clerk in the arm." Detective Daugherty said he was sure this is the case the text is referring to. Detective Daugherty said he does not remember sending or receiving these messages but has no doubt that these are actual messages based on the specific content. Detective Daugherty said his response to the message saying he spoke with Detective Meeker, is a reference to Detective Brad Meeker of the Dayton Police Department who was assigned to investigate robberies at the time for the City of Dayton Police Department.

I reviewed Detective Sollenberger's response to the message:

I asked Detective Daugherty if he responded to Detective Sollenberger's follow-up message and Detective Daugherty said he did not. I asked Detective Daugherty if he knew what Detective Sollenberger was referring to in the message regarding Detective Meeker being a "mud shark." Detective Daugherty said, "I, I don't. You know I, I Googled that word, um, you know, um, and the context doesn't make sense. I know that Sollenberger is friends with Detective Meeker. Um, you know, um, based upon the context of, at least what the Urban Dictionary says that word means, it does not make any sense to me why he would text that. So I don't know what, when he says, 'for being a mud shark,' I don't really know what he means by that."

Detective Daugherty said the printout of text messages appear to be a running total of the text conversations he would have had with Detective Sollenberger at the time, approximately one conversation every week or two.

I asked Detective Daugherty when he receives text messages with objectionable content, if he typically responds to the sender advising he did not agree or if he ignores the message. Detective Daugherty said he would probably ignore the message.

I asked Detective Daugherty if he recognized the photograph Sergeant Thomas Flanders sent to Detective Sollenberger on December 23, 2011, at 1309 hours.

Detective Daugherty said he did recognize the photograph and explained, "This is a homicide suspect that was shot during a pawn shop robbery and dumped in an alley in Detroit (Michigan). Um, I don't recall, uh, Wayne, Wayne McClain was his name." Detective Daugherty said he went to Detroit to investigate this case and sent this photograph to Sergeant Melvin Hutchison, Detective Walt Steele and Detective Mike Clymer who were in Dayton working the homicide case while Detective Chris Plummer and he were in Detroit working the case.

Detective Daugherty said he recalls sending the photograph to the Special Investigation's Detective's because the suspect was wearing the same clothing as he was wearing when the robbery and shooting at the pawn store occurred and was captured on video surveillance. Detective Daugherty said he does not recall sending the photo to Sergeant Flanders but said he could have, based on the text where Sergeant Flanders said he was going to talk to Detective Daugherty. Detective Daugherty said if he sent the photo to Sergeant Flanders it would have been in furtherance of his investigation because of the matching clothing he was wearing when found in Detroit and on the surveillance video. Detective Daugherty said this case was unique because the suspects in this case drove from Detroit to Dayton to rob a specific pawn shop, which resulted in the murder of the owner of the pawn shop and one of the suspects.

Detective Daugherty said he did not have any further information regarding this investigation. I ended the interview at 0941 hours.

Interview with Deputy Jayme Horton

On Thursday, December 18, 2014, at 1036 hours, Deputy Jayme Horton appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriffs Headquarters Building as a focus in an administrative investigation. Deputy Horton, his representative Mr. Mark Scranton, Detective Bryan Cavender and I were present for the interview. I reviewed the Policy/Waiver form and the Administrative Investigation Pre-Interview form with Deputy Horton. Deputy Horton said he understood the forms and signed both. Mr. Scranton and I witnessed his signature on the forms.

Deputy Horton has been employed by the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for over twenty years. Deputy Horton is currently assigned to the Jail Division working second watch.

Before starting the interview, Deputy Horton and Mr. Scranton had the opportunity to review the text messages provided to the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office, which are reported as being a series of text conversations between Deputy Horton and Detective Sollenberger. I asked Deputy Horton, after reviewing the text messages between him and Detective Sollenberger, if they were in fact conversations he had with Detective Sollenberger. Deputy Horton said after reviewing the messages, he recalls the incidents being talked about in the messages as being things that happened to him and his family and believes they are actual text messages. Deputy Horton said he does not recall typing each message but believes them to all be actual messages.

Deputy Horton said the messages were sent and received on his personal cellular telephone because he was not issued a Sheriff's Office cellular telephone at that time. Deputy Horton said he believes the messages were sent to Detective Sollenberger's personal cellular telephone.

I asked Deputy Horton about the series of three messages starting with "So what's up with Karl clearing houses and standing point? That kid annoys me." Deputy Horton said that was a text from Detective Sollenberger to him about the television show The Walking Dead. Deputy Horton explained the text messages on the left side of the page are messages he wrote and sent and the messages on the right side of the page are messages Detective Sollenberger sent.

Deputy Horton confirmed he sent the text, "Karls a bad ass now. Stone cold nigga." I asked Deputy Horton if the term "nigga" was a term he would use at work. He said, "No. Um, I, ah, I mean it's, I probably heard that word twenty times last week. Transporting inmates back and forth. I think an inmate even called me that last week. Talking about, I mean it's like urban slang I guess I would say. Would I go around and saying it to people, uh, no. I, I wouldn't because, yeah it could be offensive." I asked Deputy Horton what he meant by using the slang word in the context of his message. Deputy Horton said, "I would mean it like. I don't know, like tough guy, like uh. Could I have chosen a better word? Yeah, obviously I could have said gangsta, maybe replaced it with something like that. Um, I didn't mean to hurt anybody's feelings or to offend anyone. I was actually talking about a, an eleven year old white kid on a TV show." Deputy Horton said he was not using the slang term to describe or offend a group of people.

I asked Deputy Horton about the text sent from Detective Sollenberger saying, "Why is it that every morning at the school drop off we have to wait on the negroes. What takes them so long to get out if(sic) the cars?" Deputy Horton explained at that time, 0755 hours, Detective Sollenberger was probably dropping his kids of at school, which is where Deputy Horton said his son also attends. Deputy Horton confirmed he responded to the text about thirty minutes later saying, "They is in no hurry for noooooobody. (Sic) Lordy .... " Deputy Horton said he could not explain Detective Sollenberger's message other than what it says, and he felt Detective Sollenberger was upset regarding the time it takes to drop kids off at the school. Deputy Horton said the school drop off is typically a slow process and his response was not a response to Detective Sollenberger's use of the word "negroes" but would be his typical response for anyone one taking a long time to drop off their kids at the school.

Deputy Horton said the terms "nigger, negro and nigga" are terms that are used throughout some of the conversations he had with Detective Sollenberger. I asked Deputy Horton about the comment Detective Sollenberger sent him saying, "Just because a nigger scammed the election and is pres. It does not give the G-damn right to shop at DLM." Deputy Horton said DLM is a reference to Dorothy Lane Market and the comment is obviously Detective Sollenberger expressing his displeasure that people of color are shopping there.

I asked Deputy Horton about the text Detective Sollenberger sent saying, "It's way to (sic) early for my nigrometer to be at 96%." Deputy Horton said on review it appears that was a weekday and sent just before eight o'clock and could be another reference to dropping kids off at school. Deputy Horton said he responded to the message with, "You definitely would not like my arraignment docket then" Deputy Horton said his response was to tell Detective Sollenberger there were a lot of people of color on his docket so Detective Sollenberger would not like it.

I asked Deputy Horton if he was using an iPhone during these conversations or an Android device. Deputy Horton said it would have been an Android device because he has never owned or used an iPhone. I asked Deputy Horton about the photograph he sent on January 9, 2014, to Detective Sollenberger. Deputy Horton said it appears to be a photograph of somebody's feet wearing shower shoes and an Administrative Segregation yellow Jail Uniform.

Deputy Horton said he did not have any further information regarding this investigation. I ended the interview at 1055 hours.

Interview with Sergeant Brian Lewis

On Thursday, December 18, 2014, at 1140 hours, Sergeant Brian Lewis appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriffs Headquarters Building as a focus in an administrative investigation. Sergeant Lewis, his representative Mr. Joe Hegedus, Detective Bryan Cavender and I were present for the interview. I reviewed the Policy/Waiver form and the Administrative Investigation Pre-Interview form with Sergeant Lewis. Sergeant Lewis said he understood the forms and signed both. Mr. Hegedus and I witnessed his signature on the forms.

Sergeant Lewis has been employed with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for over nine years. Sergeant Lewis has been a supervisor for over three years. Sergeant Lewis is currently assigned as the Administrative Sergeant for the Regional Dispatch Center on second watch.

I reviewed the allegation and documents I provided to Sergeant Lewis when I served him with notice of the investigation. Sergeant Lewis said he understood the allegation and had reviewed the documents I provided him. Sergeant Lewis said the documents appeared to be text messages between himself and Detective Sollenberger with the left side of the pages being text messages from him (Lewis) and the right side being messages from Detective Sollenberger. Sergeant Lewis said he did not recall individual text messages due to the length of time since the conversations occurred. Sergeant Lewis said he did not recall any of the conversations specifically but said many of them were consistent with things he would have known.

I asked Sergeant Lewis about the series of messages with a photograph. Sergeant Lewis said he took the photograph of Sergeant Terry Ables. Sergeant Lewis said he may have sent the photograph to Detective Sollenberger. I asked Sergeant Lewis where the phone number 225-4034 went to. Sergeant Lewis said it went to the Booking Sergeant's office in the Montgomery County Jail where he was assigned as a sergeant with Sergeant Ables in October of 2012, when the text was sent. Sergeant Lewis said the photograph was taken with his personal phone while he was at work.

I asked Sergeant Lewis about a message that appeared before the photograph which he wrote saying, "Congrats bomb boy." Sergeant Lewis said that text was sent to Detective Sollenberger when he was assigned to the Dayton Bomb Squad. Sergeant Lewis said Detective Sollenberger was the only person he would have sent that message to.

I asked Sergeant Lewis about the text messages from March 30, 2012, that make reference to Boston's:

Sergeant Lewis said it is Boston's Bistro which serves pizza and alcoholic beverages. I asked Sergeant Lewis who Detective Sollenberger was with who is referred to as Craig. Sergeant Lewis said Craig Stivers who is a mutual friend of his and Detective Sollenberger. I asked Sergeant Lewis what "Nog beer" was. He said, "Uh, thu, Nog means thug." I asked Sergeant Lewis what he meant when he sent "Hope u packing." Sergeant Lewis said, "So I'm referring if, if there's thugs and your around a bunch of thugs, I hope you're packing." I asked Sergeant Lewis when Detective Sollenberger used the term "niggers" if he (Lewis) took Detective Sollenberger to mean criminal thugs, which is why he referred to "Nog beer." Sergeant Lewis said, "I don't use. I don't use that word. Um, I guess. I've heard that word, we all know what it means to society. It can mean, it means a few things, I guess. Um, it can mean a term of endearment, depending on the people having the conversation. Um, it can mean a derogatory comment. Um, so it's all going to be, depending on who the people are having the conversation. Uh, so if somebody, ahh, in this case, I took it as a they're meaning thugs, I just don't mean, or ah you could call it whatever you want, uh, uh, less than desirable people. Uh, ah, you could call it all kinds of things. It's just a word I've used for as long as I can remember for the word thug. Um, never really thought much about it."

At this point Mr. Hegedus clarified that Sergeant Lewis was talking about the term "Nog."

Sergeant Lewis said when he asks Detective Sollenberger if he was "packing" he is asking if he is carrying a gun, because he thought Detective Sollenberger was at a place where there were criminal "thugs." Sergeant Lewis said the text was made partially in jest and is a common bravado joke among law enforcement officers.

I asked Sergeant Lewis what he thought Detective Sollenberger meant by the texts. Sergeant Lewis said, "No, I mean I think he's still, No. I just still think he's just talking about a black thug. I think he's talking about a thug who is of color."

Sergeant Lewis said in reviewing the rest of the text messages, the majority of the texts are joking or work related. Sergeant Lewis said although he does not specifically recall all of the messages, there is no doubt the messages are from him to Detective Sollenberger. Sergeant Lewis said the messages were personal conversations and were not intended to be made public. Sergeant Lewis said some of the messages were sent while he was on duty and some were when he was off-duty. Sergeant Lewis said the text conversations with Detective Sollenberger about Boston's Bistro occurred while he was off-duty.

Sergeant Lewis explained the comments look bad on paper and he cannot speak to Detective Sollenberger's mindset or meaning at the time. Sergeant Lewis said he has known Detective Sollenberger and worked directly with him for years and has never seen Detective Sollenberger mistreat or unfairly treat anyone as part of his job with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office. Sergeant Lewis continued saying he personally has never treated anyone differently based upon a racial, ethnic background, religion, or belief either in his personal or professional life.

Sergeant Lewis said he did not have any further information regarding this investigation. I ended the interview at 1203 hours.

Interview with Deputy Joseph Connelly

On Thursday, December 18, 2014, at 1502 hours, Deputy Joseph Connelly appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriff's Headquarters Building as a focus in an administrative investigation. Deputy Connelly, his representative Mr. Mark Scranton, Detective Bryan Cavender and I were present for the interview. I reviewed the Policy/Waiver form and the Administrative Investigation Pre-Interview form with Deputy Connelly. Deputy Connelly said he understood the forms and signed both. Mr. Scranton and I witnessed his signature on the forms.

Deputy Connelly has been employed by the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for over three years. Deputy Connelly is currently assigned to the Washington Township Substation on third watch.

I asked Deputy Connelly if the text messages we were investigating were text messages between him and Detective Sollenberger. Deputy Connelly said he did not remember each specific text message, but after reviewing them, he believes them to be text conversations between himself and Detective Sollenberger. Deputy Connelly said in reviewing the printed text messages the messages on the left side of the page in the white balloons were his (Connelly's) messages and the messages on the right side of the page in blue would have been Detective Sollenberger's messages. Deputy Connelly said the messages were sent from his personal iPhone to Detective Sollenberger's personal iPhone.

I asked Deputy Connelly about a series of text messages from October 31, 2012:

Deputy Connelly said he recalled this incident saying, "I remember Mike that, uh, he, Jen had run a, run the bathtub and had put a washcloth, if I remember correctly, in the uh, overflow opening. And, uh, and then, left, left the bathroom, forgot that she left the bathtub running and it overflowed and flooded his basement." Deputy Connelly said Jen is Detective Sollenberger's estranged wife.

Deputy Connelly said he eventually asked Detective Sollenberger if he needed a shop vac. Deputy Connelly said Detective Sollenberger did not immediately reply, but sent a short time later "No, Pm good. I need a shovel and bag of lime." I asked Deputy Connelly what he thought the statement meant. Deputy Connelly said, "Uh, ah humorous statement that he was upset with his wife. That she had done something, um, poor judgment, and that he was going to kill her." Deputy Connelly said this statement was clearly a joke, and he responded by carrying on the joke when he texted, "Ok, my family owns 120 acres in Indy if you need it."

I asked Deputy Connelly about the texts from November 2, 2012, following the bathtub texts:

Deputy Connelly said these messages were during his duty time with the Sheriff's Office where he was going to stop by and talk to Detective Sollenberger. Deputy Connelly said Detective Sollenberger's response, "C-bus" was an abbreviation for Columbus and POTUS is an abbreviation for President of the United States. Deputy Connelly said he took the reference to mean Detective Sollenberger was working a security detail in Columbus due to a campaign visit from the President.

I asked Deputy Connelly about some of the other names that appear in the text messages. Deputy Connelly said [CHILD] is short for [CHILD] which is his (Connelly's) son. Deputy Connelly said he is good friends with Detective Sollenberger, knows his children and has been to his house many times. Deputy Connelly said the text messages appeared to be text messages between him and Detective Sollenberger.

I asked Deputy Connelly about the following series of text messages:

Deputy Connelly said at the time of these texts he was assigned to the Courts Section of the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office and was responsible for security at various posts throughout Montgomery County. Deputy Connelly said he thought Detective Sollenberger was referring to the Common Pleas Court Judges that may be hearing cases with individuals of color following President Obama' s re-election.

Deputy Connelly said his response to Detective Sollenberger was "LOL" (laugh out loud)" ... stuck at CSB again." Deputy Connelly said "CSB" was a reference to Montgomery County Children's Services Bureau (CSB), which was a common assignment for him while he worked in the Courts Section.

I asked Deputy Connelly what he took Detective Sollenberger's response "Of course there will be no visitation cause they were out late partying." Deputy Connelly said, "Yeah, that, um, African Americas were excited that President Obama was re-elected, and so they were out late celebrating." I asked Deputy Connelly about the visitation portion of the comment. Detective Connelly said, "Um, well, and that, it would be interrupted. Because any African Americans who had visitation on that particular day would probably not be able to make it." Deputy Connelly said CSB has set visitation times for family members to visit with their children who have been placed into the custody ofCSB.

I reviewed the next four comments with Deputy Connelly. Deputy Connelly explained his ex-wife's name is Emily who voted for President Obama in both presidential elections. I asked Detective Connelly what he took Detective Sollenberger's next comment, "That makes her a mud shark." to mean. Deputy Connelly said, "Well I've heard a bottom feeder or a woman, a Caucasian woman who um engages in relationships with African American male, males." Detective Connelly said he took the meaning of Detective Sollenberger's comment to be his ex-wife was someone who engages in relations with African American males "mud shark" because she voted for President Obama. Deputy Connelly said he responded with the abbreviation "LMFAO" which means "laughing my fucking ass off."

I asked Deputy Connelly about Detective Sollenberger's next text referring to a Facebook Post Deputy Connelly made concerning the debt his son was going to incur. Deputy Connelly said he recalled making a Facebook comment about the impact on his son due to an economic policy that was enacted.

I asked Deputy Connelly about the following series of text messages, particularly the three messages about Veteran's Day:

Deputy Connelly explained the messages saying, "Uh, I was in the Marines, I did two deployments in Iraq. I'm assuming that was what that was referring to." Deputy Connelly said "sand nigger" would be a derogatory term for a person of Middle Eastern descent. Deputy Connelly said in his response he used the term "muj" which means Mujahideen. Deputy Connelly said his comment was made in jest, as a form of bravado. Deputy Connelly said the majority of the text messages were jokes between two guys, often times trying to "one up" each other.

I asked Deputy Connelly about this series of text messages:

Deputy Connelly said he does not recall this conversation with Detective Sollenberger. When asked, Deputy Connelly said it looked like he was telling Detective Sollenberger his wife, Jenn Sollenberger, was posting photos from his (Sollenberger's) daughter' [CHILD] sleep over where there were "black" people in his house. Deputy Connelly said Detective Sollenberger replied he kept an eye on them and said Deputy Connelly's wife voted for one. Deputy Connelly said that would be another reference to his ex-wife voting for President Obama. Deputy Connelly said his response was to refer to his ex-wife as, " ... practically a mud shark in my eyes now." Deputy Connelly said the meaning would be, "A Caucasian woman who engages in a relationship with an African American male."

I asked Deputy Connelly about the series of text messages from December 11, 2012, when he worked overtime at District 10:

Deputy Connelly said he did not recall this conversation and said he has only worked two or three shifts at District 10. I asked Deputy Connelly if he ever recalled having a conversation with Detective Sollenberger about Deputy Talmadge Crosby. Deputy Connelly said he did recall a conversation he had with Detective Sollenberger similar to these text messages. Deputy Connelly said Detective Sollenberger has referred to Deputy Crosby, who is an African American, as a coward and as someone who has dated and is married to Caucasian women. Deputy Connelly said during the conversation Detective Sollenberger told him to not wait for Deputy Crosby to, "pull the trigger." Deputy Connelly said he took the comment in a joking matter and responded with bravado by saying, "I wait on no man. They will have to get in line."

Deputy Connelly clarified the comment by explaining he does not work his job with the idea he is going to shoot someone when he works. Deputy Connelly said he is trained to respond to each incident based on the unique circumstances presented and reacts according to the incident. Deputy Connelly said his comment, although bravado and joking, is a true statement meaning he has the ability to see each situation and make decisions without influence from other deputies or individuals. Deputy Connelly said he believed Detective Sollenberger's response was to further joke by saying, "Just watch out for the black ball curled up with a deputy uniform on." Deputy Connelly said he continued the joke by saying "LMFAO! That would be a tripping hazard."

I asked Deputy Connelly if he recalled the text messages immediately following the conversation about Deputy Crosby. Deputy Connelly said he did recall having a conversation with Detective Sollenberger about a helmet Detective Sollenberger was issued as part of the Dayton Bomb Squad that did not fit properly.

Deputy Connelly said the conversations captured in the text messages presented to him were an accurate reflection of conversations he has had with Detective Sollenberger since they have known each other.

Deputy Connelly said the text messages were intended to be private conversations between him and Detective Sollenberger. Deputy Connelly said they were never intended to be public and are not appropriate conversations for a public setting. Deputy Connelly said the slang terms used do not reflect his professional opinion of people and he intended them as a way of joking with Detective Sollenberger. Deputy Connelly said his work performance or decisions have never been influenced or affected by the race, religion or background of any individual he has dealt with.

Deputy Connelly said he did not have any further information regarding this investigation. I ended the interview at 1529 hours.

Interview with Captain Thomas Flanders

On Friday, December 19, 2014, at approximately 0932 hours, Captain Thomas Flanders appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriff's Headquarters Building as a focus in an administrative investigation. Captain Flanders, his representative Mr. Doug Brannon, Sergeant Dave Parin and I were present for the interview. Sergeant Parin reviewed the Policy/Waiver form and the Administrative Investigation Pre-Interview form with Captain Flanders. Captain Flanders said he understood the forms and signed both. Sergeant Parin and Mr. Brannon witnessed his signature on the forms.

Note: This interview was reviewed and summarized by Detective Bryan Cavender.

Captain Flanders has been employed with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for nineteen and a half years. Captain Flanders is currently assigned to the Jail Division. Captain Flanders has been a captain for approximately two years and was a sergeant for approximately five years prior to being promoted to captain.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he reviewed the text messages he was provided when he was served his notice of investigation. Captain Flanders stated he did review the texts. Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if the texts appeared to be between him and Detective Sollenberger, Captain Flanders replied "some" but believed Jenn Sollenberger took actual text messages and did some "cutting and pasting and added text to actual conversations." Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he believed that some of the texts were authentic and some were fabricated to which Captain Flanders stated "they could be."

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if it appeared that the texts on the left side of the page were his and the texts on the right side of the page were those of Detective Sollenberger. Captain Flanders stated he was told his texts are on the left side and Detective Sollenberger's were on the right side when he was given the copy of the texts for review. Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if, based on what he read and the type of format the texts are in, the text messages on the left appear to come from him and the text on the right appear to be Detective Sollenberger's, Captain Flanders replied, "that's the way I read them".

Sergeant Parin had Captain Flanders review the first text dated November 18, 2012, "Any fartbox sightings," and asked if this was a common comment between him and Detective Sollenberger during that period of time. Captain Flanders replied, "Yeah, fartbox is a known nickname for Major Landis." Sergeant Parin asked if this was a common term he would use with Detective Sollenberger, Captain Flanders replied "yes." Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he supervised Detective Sollenberger during the time period of these text messages, Captain Flanders replied, "I did." Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he was the sergeant of the Inspectional Services Unit during the time of these text messages, Captain Flanders replied "correct." Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if this was a text conversation about work, Captain Flanders stated that it appeared to be.

Sergeant Parin reviewed a text about Jana Huber and asked Captain Flanders if he knew who she was. Captain Flanders stated she used to be a prosecutor. Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders who Jana Huber became engaged to, he replied that he honestly did not know his name until he read the text. Captain Flanders stated he did not type, "Ger'ald P Diddy Parker?" Captain Flanders stated, "I don't type that way, I've, there are no quotes, there's an apostrophe out of place, and I don't know Gerald Parker well enough to write something like that." Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he thought the entire conversation about Jana Huber was fabricated. Captain Flanders stated things were added but does not remember having the conversation with Detective Sollenberger. Captain Flanders stated he never read the responding text, "Yep. They can make mud babies" from Detective Sollenberger. Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he knew Gerald Parker, he replied "no". Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he had ever seen Gerald Parker, to which he replied "not that I know of."

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he knew what mud babies referred to; he replied "no." Sergeant Parin asked if he had ever heard the term. Captain Flanders replied, "A mud baby? No, I've never heard that term until I read that."

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders to review the next page of text and asked if it appeared to be typical text between him and Detective Sollenberger; he replied, "Yeah."

At this point in the interview, Mr. Brannon asked if we planned to go through all the text conversations between Captain Flanders and Detective Sollenberger. Sergeant Parin responded by pointing out that Captain Flanders believed some of the texts have been altered or made up, and in order to find out what is false and what is true, we will have to go through all the text conversations line by line.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he was familiar with the format of the texts that were being reviewed. Captain Flanders stated he was not and was told that the texts were screen shots.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he thought someone typed the messages and placed them in this format to represent his (Flanders) text messages, or did he think these were actual text messages that were copied by the operating system and then saved to the phone. Captain Flanders responded, "I think that she probably took actual conversations and was able to alter them. Whether it was on a phone, or on an app, or a computer program, or what she did, I don't know."

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders to show him which text messages have been altered by Jennifer Sollenberger. Captain Flanders referred to the following text:

"All I'd have to do is ask the chief DW or Mac. I knew u were to (sic) much of a dick to allow me to do that," stating he did not remember the conversations on this page but it could be a conversation between him and Detective Sollenberger. Sergeant Parin asked if he thought any of the conversations on this page with date were altered. Captain Flanders stated that he did not believe that any of the text conversations on this page were altered.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he could identify the texts he thought had been altered or added. Captain Flanders turned to a page of text that included a picture of a deceased person. Captain Flanders stated that he had not seen that picture before. Sergeant Parin explained to him that the photo was a suspect that had attempted to rob a pawn shop in Harrison Township. The suspect was shot by the pawn shop owner and later died of his wounds. His accomplice placed his body against a wall and was later discovered by the Detroit Police Department. The photo was taken by the Detroit police, and Detective Daugherty took a picture of the photo and sent it to other detectives so it could be compared to video evidence of the robbery. The photo had been sent to him by Detective Daugherty. Captain Flanders stated he did not remember receiving the picture from Detective Daugherty and does not remember ever seeing the picture.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders although he did not remember having seen the photo and text conversation about the photo, if he believed the conversation was made up by Ms. Sollenberger. Captain Flanders replied he did not know and really does not remember seeing the picture. Captain Flanders stated if he had seen the photo before he would say so. Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders, if Detective Daugherty stated he sent the picture to him, does he believe the photo was sent. Captain Flanders stated "I have a hard time believing Brad sent me that picture. I think I would remember it." Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he ever called Detective Brad Daugherty on a case; he stated he has discussed cases with Detective Daugherty.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders what other texts were not part of his conversations. Captain Flanders stated he found it weird that Detective Sollenberger would refer to him as "Tom" because his friends call him "Tommy." Captain Flanders stated that every time Detective Sollenberger refers to him as "Tom" it seems weird to him.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders what else he thought was weird. Captain Flanders stated that the text talking about "baby's daddy," Captain Flanders indicated he had, "no knowledge of that whatsoever." Sergeant Parin asked if he believed this text conversation has been cut and pasted by someone to make it appear to be his (Flanders) text. Captain Flanders indicated that it was cut and pasted by Ms. Sollenberger, or added, which is very easy to do. Sergeant Parin asked how she would have added that text. Captain Flanders stated you could type in fake iPhone messages in Google and there are pages of how to create text messages.

Captain Flanders moved to text messages on January 16, 2012, when Detective Sollenberger texted about watching a special on Martin Luther King and him responding to those messages. Captain Flanders stated he does not have any knowledge of those texts. Captain Flanders states it appears to be random and very broken up.

Captain Flanders stated that he found a few texts such as, "I represent yo!!" and the, "f-bomb" being used. He said he does not curse and he does not talk that way.

Captain Flanders was unsure how those texts are contributed to him, whether Ms. Sollenberger cut and pasted them in, he did not know.

Captain Flanders went to the text with the date January 22, 2012, where he allegedly repeated a question he was asked by his son. Captain Flanders stated this question, "Why are black people meaner than white people," seems very juvenile. Then the text on March 30, 2012, "There's a lot of black people in Alabama. It's all Martin Luther King's fault," is a more mature question in only a few short weeks. Captain Flanders stated he did not remember those questions being asked or the responses. Captain Flanders stated that this conversation did not occur.

Captain Flanders skipped ahead to the texts referring to a joke contributed to one of his children. Captain Flanders stated this conversation never occurred. Captain Flanders stated that the child to whom this joke was attributed to was the "liberal" of the house and the joke did not happen because of that. Captain Flanders stated no one could convince him his child told that joke or that he typed it.

Captain Flanders stated he does remember the next text referring to Tiffany Heckman and Larry Lane. He stated the text refers to an investigation that occurred in the jail.

Captain Flanders stated that a lot of text messages appear to be missing between him and Detective Sollenberger. Captain Flanders stated that Detective Sollenberger and his wife were going through some rough times and a lot of their text messages were about Detective Sollenberger and his wife's deteriorating relationship.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders what else he thought was fabricated in the text messages he had reviewed. Captain Flanders referred to a second joke accredited to his daughter, reference apples and black people hanging from trees. Captain Flanders said, "There is zero way in this world that my daughter told that joke; therefore, I would have not texted it to Mike, no way."

Captain Flanders went to the next page that referred to text conversation about all little black boys should be named Jasper. Captain Flanders believes that this text conversation was inserted and random. Captain Flanders went through a few more pages of text and did not recall any of the text messages. Sergeant Parin asked him if he thought Ms. Sollenberger inserted this text and attributed it to him. Captain Flanders did not know and said he does not know what was being talked about in the text messages.

Captain Flanders reviewed a text about Detective Daugherty traveling through Birmingham and O'Charleys. Captain Flanders was sure that this text was something he texted because he gives Detective Daugherty a hard time about eating at O'Charleys. Captain Flanders believes every other text on this page was inserted. Captain Flanders stated that the conversation talking about his son and his comment on Alabama and black people never happened.

Captain Flanders reviewed more texts and stated that he believed a text referring to him having gone to Hooters was inserted. He stated that Hooters is located on Miller Lane, he resides south of town and would not travel that far to go to Hooters. Sergeant Parin asked him if he thought he could have been on vacation in Florida at the time. Captain Flanders stated that could be possible.

Captain Flanders reviewed a few more pages and stated that the conversation appeared normal but does not recall the conversations.

Captain Flanders came to a page of texts referring to Deputy Brandon Harrison. Captain Flanders stated that Brandon Harrison is a friend. Captain Flanders believes this conversation was inserted or was someone else's conversation. Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if Ms. Sollenberger knows Brandon Harrison, he replied no. Captain Flanders thinks that Detective sollenberger asked a genuine question regarding Brandon Harrison but Ms. Sollenberger "doctored it" or added to the conversation.

Captain Flanders then reviewed a text that mentioned Major Wilson pulling him aside and asking him if he wanted to quit SWAT. He said he did not ever remember having that conversation with Major Wilson. Sergeant Parin asked if the conversation could have been about back problems he was having at the time. Captain Flanders stated that he has had three back surgeries and does remember how he was feeling at the time of this text conversation. Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders based on the text with Daryl being misspelled and not remembering the conversation about him leaving SWAT, did Captain Flanders believe the conversation was inserted or altered. After looking at the text for a moment, Captain Flanders stated it looked like a real conversation he could have had and did not see a problem with the text.

Sergeant Parin asked if the text "Can u poor it on the sidewalk like I died?" was inserted. Captain Flanders said he did not recall sending that text and does not know what it refers to.

Captain Flanders reviewed more texts until he came to a text referring to a committee that classified employees could not take part in. Captain Flanders stated he does not recall that conversation and does not know to what the text is referring. Captain Flanders stated he does not know what Detective Sollenberger is referring to in the text about the "N's" in Texas.

Sergeant Parin asked him about the text referring to "Dee's son," if it could be about Captain Dee Osterfeld's son's death. Captain Flanders stated that it could be because he remembers a lot of people were looking up the report for no reason.

Sergeant Parin reviewed a page of text that appeared to be normal conversation but Captain Flanders did not recall any of the conversation. Captain Flanders stated it all looked normal until the last text on the page, "Lol! True that fool!" Captain Flanders stated he did not talk or type that way.

Sergeant Parin and Captain Flanders reviewed several text messages that Captain Flanders thought were normal conversation but did not remember the conversations. Captain Flanders read a text, "We have to drive by hoover (sic) and gburg (sic) tomorrow and check out the teddy bears." and stated it was random.

Captain Flanders reviewed several more texts that appeared normal until he came to a text that allegedly came from Detective Sollenberger. Captain Flanders found it odd that Detective Sollenberger would refer to him using his first and last name. He also thought it was odd Detective Sollenberger referred to him as Tom and not Tommy. Captain Flanders went on reviewing more texts that appeared normal but did not recall the conversation or sending the pictures associated with the text conversations. Captain Flanders did not deny sending the texts or pictures associated with the texts. Captain Flanders referred to a text in which he was drinking beer with Mayor Litezel. Captain Flanders stated he did not recall ever drinking a beer with Mayor Litezel.

Captain Flanders said he had a problem with a text that he allegedly sent about one of his children playing football. The text refers to a "black kid" being hit by his son and was down on the field. Captain Flanders believed that some of this text was inserted. Captain Flanders also took issue with the text, "Haha. It was sick. The kid laid on the ground, ripped his helmet off and was trying to breathe. He was panicked. Haha ..... negros. : )" Captain Flanders stated that it did not make any sense. Captain Flanders further said he thought the last two sentences were altered in each of the texts.

Captain Flanders came to a page of text that started with a picture. Captain Flanders stated he did not know what that picture represented and stated the whole conversation on this page and the next was inserted. Captain Flanders stated that several of the texts attributed to him on the second page were not his because he did not talk that way. Captain Flanders stated the last text on the second page could have been a text he sent.

Captain Flanders went on to the next page, stating the text from Detective Sollenberger talking about a Fox 45 reporter was inserted and he did not reply to Detective Sollenberger's comments. All of the rest of the text on this page appeared to be normal conversations between him and Detective Sollenberger.

Captain Flanders referred to page and text talking about Deputy Nate Wilson; he did not remember having that conversation.

Captain Flanders had Sergeant Parin turn to the page with the text "Willy and I napped" stating that this whole conversation on this page had been inserted.

Sergeant Parin reviewed the next page with Captain Flanders and asked if this was a normal conversation between him and Detective Sollenberger, or if it was inserted. Captain Flanders stated he did not remember this conversation and does not know what is being talked about in the text conversation.

The next page of texts that were reviewed starting on November 6, 2012. Captain Flanders stated he had a hard time believing he sent these texts and does not recall the conversation. Sergeant Parin asked if he believed this conversation was made up and inserted or if he could just not recall the conversation. Captain Flanders stated he did not think it was made up; he just does not recall having that conversation.

Sergeant Parin and Captain Flanders reviewed the rest of the text messages and it was determined that the rest of the text conversations appeared to be normal conversations.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders why he deleted all the files from the Sheriff's Office issued iPhone and iPad he turned in after being placed on administrative leave. Captain Flanders explained he used the phone as his primary phone and paid the Sheriff's Office when he made personal calls. Captain Flanders said the iPad only had personal information on the device. Captain Flanders said there were not any files from the Sheriff's Office on either device.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he had any other information regarding this investigation. Captain Flanders stated in his nineteen year career he has had no complaints against him. Since this incident, the most support he has received has come from his black friends in the Centerville community. Captain Flanders stated the texts that are being investigated do not represent him.

Sergeant Parin asked Captain Flanders if he had any knowledge of how the texts were altered or added to the text conversations that are being investigated. Mr. Brannon then spoke and provided results from a polygraph examination Captain Flanders took regarding this investigation. Mr. Brannon also provided a deposition and trial testimony from Ms. Sollenberger, which appeared to contradict each other. Mr. Brannon also provided paperwork from his specialist that questioned the authenticity of the text messages.

The interview was concluded at 1124 hours.

Interview with Detective Michael Sollenberger

On Friday, December 19,2014, at approximately 1507 hours, Detective Michael Sollenberger appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriff's Headquarters Building as a focus in an administrative investigation. Detective Sollenberger, his representative Mr. Mark Scranton, Sergeant Dave Parin and I were present for the interview. Sergeant Parin reviewed the Policy/Waiver form and the Administrative Investigation Pre-Interview form with Detective Sollenberger. Detective Sollenberger said he understood the forms and signed both. Mr. Scranton and I witnessed his signature on the forms.

Note: This interview was reviewed and summarized by Detective Bryan Cavender.

Detective Sollenberger has been employed with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for eighteen years. Detective Sollenberger is currently assigned as a detective in the Inspectional Services Unit (ISU) and has been in ISU for approximately five years.

Sergeant Parin asked Detective Sollenberger if the documents that were given to him for his review appeared to be text messages between him and other Sheriff's Office employees, he replied that it did appear to be text messages between him and other Sheriff's Office employees.

Sergeant Parin reviewed a set of text messages that were reported to be between Detective Daugherty and Detective Sollenberger. Sergeant Parin offered Detective Sollenberger multiple pages of text messages that were printed out and explained Detective Daugherty's text messages appeared on the left side of the page and Detective Sollenberger's texts/replies were on the right side of the pages. Detective Sollenberger agreed that was correct. Sergeant Parin asked Detective Sollenberger if the text messages were an actual conversation between him and Detective Daugherty. Detective Sollenberger stated they appeared to be a conversation between him and Detective Daugherty. Sergeant Parin stated he did not expect him to remember exact conversation with Detective Daugherty, but asked if this was typical language and an accurate representation of his text messages with Detective Daugherty. Detective Sollenberger stated it was not an accurate representation of his text messages, and he did not recall sending the text to Detective Daugherty.

Detective Sollenberger read one of the text messages that referred to Detective Meeker as a "mud shark." He stated that he does not know why Detective Meeker would be referred to as a "mud shark" because he was friends with Detective Meeker. Detective Sollenberger stated he does not recall sending that text message to Detective Daugherty.

Sergeant Parin asked if the rest of the text messages were conversations between him and Detective Daugherty. Detective Sollenberger stated he does not recall having sent any of the text messages to Detective Daugherty.

Sergeant Parin asked Detective Sollenberger about a text which referred to Detective Daugherty being in St. Louis. Detective Sollenberger stated he assumed Detective Daugherty was in St. Louis for a baseball game, but now that he was able to see the date of the text, he did not believe Daugherty was in St. Louis for a baseball game. Sergeant Parin informed Detective Sollenberger that Detective Daugherty was in St. Louis to interview a possible homicide suspect and provided Detective Sollenberger a supplemental report that Detective Daugherty completed reference his interview with the suspect. Detective Sollenberger reviewed the report and stated he did not recall having the text conversation with Detective Daugherty. When Sergeant Parin asked him if it appears that it was a conversation between him and Detective Daugherty he stated that it did appear to be a conversation with Detective Daugherty.

Detective Sollenberger stated he could not recall any of the text conversations with Detective Daugherty. When asked by Sergeant Parin if the comment about Detective Meeker being a "mud shark" could be fabricated, Detective Sollenberger stated anything is possible and he did not recall sending the text about Detective Meeker and did not understand why he would refer to Detective Meeker as a "mud shark."

Sergeant Parin reviewed the text messages between Detective Sollenberger and Sergeant Lewis. Sergeant Parin asked if the text messages appeared to be between him and Sergeant Lewis, he replied, "they appeared to be." Sergeant Parin asked him if this was a type of text conversation he would have had with Sergeant Lewis. Detective Sollenberger stated it appears to be; however, he does not recall because the conversation occurred in 2011.

Sergeant Parin questioned Detective Sollenberger about Boston's and if he remembered the text conversation with Sergeant Lewis. Detective Sollenberger said it appears to have been a text conversation with him and Sergeant Lewis, but it was over two years ago, and he does not recall having the text conversation with Sergeant Lewis. Sergeant Parin asked him if the rest of the conversation appears to be with Sergeant Lewis. Detective Sollenberger stated it appeared that way. Sergeant Parin asked Detective Sollenberger if the texts were comments he would have made to Sergeant Lewis. Detective Sollenberger stated no and referred to a message that he appeared to have sent about playing a Hank Williams song. Detective Sollenberger stated he would not have done that and does not like Hank Williams and does not recall having this conversation.

Sergeant Parin asked Detective Sollenberger about the rest of the conversation with Sergeant Lewis and asked if the text sent by him, "BTW the niggers are trying to take over Boston's," which Sergeant Lewis replied, "Who left the gate open!!!!!!! They don't serve Nog beer there." Detective Sollenberger state he did not recall having that conversation with Sergeant Lewis. Sergeant Parin asked if the text messages between him and Sergeant Lewis were the kind of text messages they had on a regular basis; Detective Sollenberger stated no. When asked if these text messages were out of character for him, he stated that it was. Sergeant Parin asked if he had ever had a text conversation like this, Detective Sollenberger stated, "I do not know."

Sergeant Parin asked if the rest of the conversation appeared to be a conversation between him and Sergeant Lewis, to which Detective Sollenberger replied, "I don't know."

Sergeant Parin asked Detective Sollenberger, if Sergeant Lewis had identified the conversation between him and Detective Sollenberger as a conversation that they did in fact have, would Sergeant Lewis be correct. Detective Sollenberger stated that Sergeant Lewis would not be correct. When Sergeant Parin asked again whether or not he had the text conversation with Sergeant Lewis, Detective Sollenberger stated he did not remember sending the text to Sergeant Lewis, due to the two plus years that passed since the text conversation took place. Detective Sollenberger stated that he did not recall any of the text messages between him and Sergeant Lewis.

Sergeant Parin asked Detective Sollenberger if he remembered any of the text messages he was given when served with his notice to appear for an interview. Detective Sollenberger stated he was told the NAACP said these text messages came off of his personal cell phone, and he does not recall the text messages.

Sergeant Parin asked Detective Sollenberger if he recalled any of the text messages. Detective Sollenberger stated he looked through all of the text messages and some of them do not make any sense, and he thinks things have been altered, changed or deleted. When asked what had been altered, changed or deleted, Detective Sollenberger stated he did not recall sending or receiving any of the derogatory phrases. Detective Sollenberger stated that documents are presented as a PDF file and could be easily altered.

Detective Sollenberger believes that his estranged wife, Jennifer Sollenberger, sent the text messages that she created to the NAACP to discredit him prior to their divorce trial.

Sergeant Parin asked Detective Sollenberger if he recalled any of the text messages between him and Deputy Connelly, such as referring to "sand niggers" or "shooting people." Detective Sollenberger stated he did not recall the text messages. Sergeant Parin asked Detective Sollenberger, if Deputy Connelly recalled the text conversation, would he (Connelly) be inaccurate. Detective Sollenberger replied, "Yeah, I mean, I don't recall." When asked if Deputy Connelly was lying and was insubordinate the previous day during his interview regarding this incident, Detective Sollenberger stated Deputy Connelly was mistaken and that he does not recall having that text conversation with Deputy Connelly.

Sergeant Parin asked whether Detective Sollenberger would be able to recall any of the text conversations that were provided to him when he was served his Notice of Investigation or would his answers continue to be that he did not recall, in which case we were just going to be taking up time by going through the rest of the text messages. Detective Sollenberger stated he was going to answer his questions.

Detective Sollenberger stated that while reviewing all the text messages, he did see a text message between him and Deputy Connelly that referred to Ms. Sollenberger overflowing the bathtub. He stated he remembered Ms. Sollenberger overflowing the bathtub but does not recall having a text message conversation with Deputy Connelly about the incident. Sergeant Parin then posed the question, if Deputy Connelly said he had the conversation with Detective Sollenberger and that was an accurate reflection of that conversation, would he (Connelly) be correct. Detective Sollenberger replied, "I suppose."

Sergeant Parin asked about the text conversation: "So how many of the niggers are asking the judges to set them free since Barry won," which was reported as being sent by Detective Sollenberger with the reply by Deputy Connelly, "Lol. I dunno. I am stuck at Csb again." Detective Sollenberger stated he did not recall sending that text message. Sergeant Parin asked if he would have sent a text message like that, and Detective Sollenberger replied "no."

Sergeant Parin asked about the text: ''U should be able to file for full custody since Emily voted for him," and, "That makes her a mud shark." Detective Sollenberger stated, "I do not recall sending that."

Sergeant Parin asked, regardless of what Deputy Connelly said, you are saying you did not send the messages, correct? Detective Sollenberger stated "yes." Sergeant Parin asked if Detective Sollenberger had anything else to add and he replied "no."

The interview was concluded at 1534 hours.

Interview with Mr. Derrick Foward

On Monday, December 22, 2014, at approximately 1429 hours, Major Daryl Wilson and I met with Mr. Derrick Foward at the Dayton Offices of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), 1528 West Doctor Martin Luther King Way, Dayton, Ohio, for an administrative interview. Mr. Foward, Major Wilson and I were present for the recorded interview. Mr. Marshall Taylor, legal counsel for the NAACP participated in the interview via telephone.

Prior to going on the recorded I advised Mr. Foward we had been contacted by Ms. Jennifer Sollenberger regarding the complaint. Mr. Foward advised he would not reveal the name of the individual who brought the complaint to him and would only refer to them as the complainant during the interview.

Mr. Foward is the President of the Dayton Unit of the NAACP. Mr. Foward has been the President of the Dayton Unit of the NAACP since 2007 and was recently elected to his fifth term as president.

Mr. Foward said in August of2014, the complainant brought information about text messages that were exchanged between deputies of the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office. Mr. Foward said he asked the complainant about the content of the messages, and as the information was revealed, Mr. Foward became disturbed by the content. Mr. F oward said that as he recalled, the complainant had a laptop computer that displayed the text messages supporting the allegations. Mr. Foward said the second time he met with the complainant, a binder was brought in with the messages printed.

Mr. Foward said the complainant identified the individuals involved in sending and receiving the text messages for him. Mr. Foward explained the NAACP assists citizens with complaints with racism and law enforcement. Mr. Foward said this complaint involved racism within law enforcement. Mr. Foward said the complainant said the text messages were primarily Mike Sollenberger and Tom Flanders and the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office Internal Affairs. Mr. F oward said the complainant provided him with five Portable Document Format (PDF) computer files of the text messages on a flash drive for the NAACP to file and investigate the complaint. Mr. Foward said the common denominator to all of the messages was Mike Sollenberger was involved in every conversation.

Mr. Foward said the conversations were reported to be: Mike Sollenberger with Tom Flanders, Mike Sollenberger with Brad Daugherty, Mike Sollenberger and Brian Lewis, Mike Sollenberger and Jayme Horton, and Mike Sollenberger and Joe Connelly.

I asked Mr. Foward if the complainant told him how the files were found. Mr. Foward said the complainant told him one of their children was going through the house obviously looking for something. Mr. Foward said the complainant questioned the child who was very reluctant to tell what they were looking for. Mr. Foward said the complainant told him that after some questioning, the child said their father wanted them to find the phone and bring it to him, without telling the complainant.

Mr. Foward reviewed the printed documents (large black binder of the printed PDF files) and said they were the same files the complainant brought to him in August.

I asked Mr. Foward what he did with the files after receiving them in August. Mr. Foward said the complainant was scared concerning the text messages, and feared reprisals from the individuals involved in the text messages. Mr. Foward explained he received the official complaint on August 4, 2014. Mr. Foward said on August 5, 2014, John Crawford III was shot to death by Beavercreek Police Officers and on August 6, 2014, he (Foward) received a written complaint from his (Crawford's) family concerning the actions of police in that shooting. Mr. Foward said because of the fears of the complainant in the investigation concerning the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office deputies and the case of the shooting in Beavercreek going on at the same time, they took their time reviewing all of the documents. Mr. Foward said they contacted a representative of the Criminal Justice Department of the National Office of the NAACP to review the complaint. Mr. Foward said they conducted some research on similar incidents of text messages in which he found a similar case from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Mr. Foward said he contacted one of the National Board Members of the NAACP to discuss the case from Louisiana and the case here in Dayton.

Mr. Foward said that after speaking with the board member, he consulted with the legal department ofNAACP to decide how they were going to pursue this investigation. Mr. Foward said in light of the incidents that happened in the nation at the time, such as riots in Ferguson, Missouri, in response to police shooting of an African American, he decided to pursue this investigation slowly.

Mr. Foward said that on November 30, 2014, he contacted Major Daryl Wilson and Sheriff Phil Plummer to advise them of the allegations and allow them to conduct an investigation before releasing the information to the media. Mr. Foward said during the meeting with Sheriff Plummer and Major Wilson, he showed them the documents and pointed out portions of the texts which were offensive and pertinent to the complaint filed with the NAACP. Mr. Foward said he read the highlighted portions to Sheriff Plummer and Major Wilson and told them the text messages represented the focus of their complaint, and said they were part of a larger set of documents, which represented the totality of the text messages between Captain Flanders, Sergeant Lewis, Detective Sollenberger, Detective Daugherty, Deputy Horton, and Deputy Connelly. Mr. Foward explained he did not have authorization from the complainant to release any of the documents at that time, so he reviewed the texts and showed them to Sheriff Plummer and Major Wilson but did not give them the documents.

Mr. Foward said after the meeting with Sheriff Plummer and Major Wilson, he re-contacted the complainant and received permission to release the portion of the documents that were offensive to the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for investigation. Mr. Foward identified the smaller photocopied binder of text messages, which contain text messages that are highlighted by check mark, as the documents he provided Major Wilson on Tuesday, December 2, 2014. Mr. Foward said he identified the offensive texts by making the highlights or check marks beside. Mr. Foward pointed out the series of text messages where there is a photo of a deceased African American leaning against a building and texts about that photo as an example of the check marks he made throughout the documents.

I asked Mr. Foward if he had any other documents or information he received from the complainant other than the PDF files of the text messages originally provided, and which he provided full copies to Major Wilson on December 15, 2014. Mr. Foward said all of the documents he received have been copied and given to Major Wilson. Mr. Foward said one of the things he wanted to review, which the complainant advised was in their possession, was the phone the messages were sent on. Mr. Foward said the complainant did not allow him to view the phone but said it was available if needed.

Mr. Foward then relayed a story of an individual convicted of ethnic intimidation in Drexel, where he convinced his son to set fire to a neighbor's house to prevent the neighbor from testifying in court. Mr. Foward then read the following texts:

Mr. Foward said they discovered [CHILD] is the son of Captain Flanders. Mr. Foward then read the following texts:

Mr. Foward said [CHILD] is the daughter of Captain Flanders. Mr. Foward said, "So there's a thing called weed and seed. Weed out the bad, seed in the good. And I know that that's what a lot of people try to do. Whether that's on the job, whether or not that's in the community wherever, whether or not it's in the Church. Wherever it's at, people try to weed and seed. But unfortunately there's a third word. That appened in the case in Drexel. And, apparently, is happening in the case of these detectives, and that is breed. Breeding your kids to be racist." Mr. Foward then read the following text:

Mr. Foward said, "The NAACP has fought for a hundred and five years nationally and ninety-nine years here in our local community, against lynching laws. In fact, there's a lady by the name of Mary White Ovington, white lady, who was tired of the lynchings that was happening to people of a darker shade than her. She's the one, who in the early 1900's organized a group of people, to found the body known as the NAACP. A ca, A Caucasian lady had the courage to stand up amid opposition, during those early years of segregation, to stand up against things like this. So when we talk about black people hanging from trees, that's hit, that hits home for a lot of, especially our seniors, who lived through those turbulent times. Their parents, their grandparents, who lived through some of those turbulent times. And in fact, since I have been president of the NAACP ah, there was a, you know, I've still heard of a few lynchings, not that many, but at least two that I can recall myself, here in modern day times. So, so that doesn't sit well with someone of African American descent."

Mr. Foward said since he has been president, he has had a good relationship with Sheriff Plummer and the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office. Mr. Foward said he trusted that if he sent a complainant to the Sheriff's Office with a complaint about the actions of a Sheriffs employee the Internal Affairs Section (lnspectional Services Unit) would fairly investigate the complaint. Mr. Foward said since he has seen the apparent racial bias of Captain Flanders, who was the sergeant supervising the Inspectional Services Unit, and Detective Sollenberger, who was the detective in the Inspectional Services Unit, at the time of the text messages, he questioned whether the investigations they conducted were fair.

Major Wilson asked Mr. Foward how he identified who wrote the texts. Mr. Foward said the complainant identified who each person was who texted each time. Mr. Foward said the sender and receiver then became evident as the conversations continue.

Mr. Foward said he had one additional text message he wanted to speak about, specifically and then read the texts starting with the second window (I included the first window which was not given as part of the original documents given to us by Mr. Foward for the sake of clarity):

Mr. Foward said Boston's refers to a neighborhood bar in Englewood. Mr. Foward said he does not know what the term "Nog beer" is. After Mr. Foward read the section ending with "I hope u (sic) packing," he said, "So why, because, some black men walked in, would you need to be packing? So, that's the issue with community and police relations right now. Because in your mind, black people are bad, black people are, what, what, whatever the mindset is. But it's in this particular person's mindset, that you need to be packing." Mr. Foward read the rest of the message then said, "So this person is telling you exactly how they feel. So it doesn't get any better than that. Exactly how they, 'I hate niggers. That is all.'"

Major Wilson asked Mr. Foward what the demeanor of the complainant was when he met with them. Mr. Foward said he saw fear as the primary demeanor of the complainant. I asked Mr. Foward if he, based on his experiences of interviewing people, was able to determine the credibility of the complainant who brought this complaint to him. Mr. Foward said based on the interviews and supporting documents, he found the complainant to be credible.

Mr. F oward said he did not have any further information regarding this investigation. I ended the interview at 1512 hours.

Interview with Deputy Jayme Horton

On Wednesday, January 14, 2015, at 1208 hours, Deputy Jayme Horton appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriffs Headquarters Building as a focus in an administrative investigation. Deputy Horton, his representative Mr. Mark Scranton, Detective Bryan Cavender and I were present for the interview. I reviewed the Policy/Waiver form and the Administrative Investigation Pre-Interview form with Deputy Horton. Deputy Horton said he understood the forms and signed both. Mr. Scranton and Detective Cavender witnessed his signature on the forms.

This was a second interview with Deputy Horton to clarify and follow-up on some questions from his first interview.

Deputy Horton has been employed by the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for over twenty years. Deputy Horton is currently assigned to the Jail Division working second watch.

I asked Deputy Horton, as a follow-up to his first interview, in his over twenty years of working for the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office, if he has ever allowed any personal bias or feeling based on race, religion, ethnicity or any other differing view to influence how he treated a member of the community during his job as a deputy sheriff. Deputy Horton said, "No way." I asked Deputy Horton if he has based his job decisions on the facts and circumstances each incident has presented him. Deputy Horton said, "Absolutely. I've worked, probably every district and every shift over the past twenty years, and you'd be hard pressed to find anybody who got an unfair shake from me just because of what they look like or who they go to bed with at night or what sex they are that's, no, absolutely not."

I asked Deputy Horton if he has any doubt as to the authenticity of the text messages reported to be between himself and Detective Sollenberger. Deputy Horton said he believes the text messages are authentic.

Deputy Horton said he wanted to expand on the question I asked earlier about bias. Deputy Horton said, "Just my record, or lack thereof, in this case, shows that, you know, I've, I've never, had any citizen complain on me, in twenty years. That they were treated differently because of who they are, or who they are not. Uh, I probably transport a hundred inmates a week, and they're in jail, and not happy already, and I don't think you'd find one of them over the past few years that would say, 'Oh yeah I remember him, he gave me a raw deal because I'm a black person or because I'm a woman or anything.' You're not going to find that."

Deputy Horton said the text messages were intended to be private and were not intended to become public. Deputy Horton said the intended jokes have never affected his performance as a deputy sheriff.

Deputy Horton said he did not have any additional information regarding this investigation. I ended the interview at 1214 hours.

Interview with Deputy Joseph Connelly

On Wednesday, January 14, 2015, at 1419 hours, Deputy Joseph Connelly appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriffs Headquarters Building as a focus in an administrative investigation. Deputy Connelly, his representative Mr. Mark Scranton, Detective Bryan Cavender and I were present for the interview. I reviewed the Policy/Waiver form and the Administrative Investigation Pre-Interview form with Deputy Connelly. Deputy Connelly said he understood the forms and signed both. Mr. Scranton and Detective Cavender witnessed his signature on the forms.

This was a second interview with Deputy Connelly to clarify and follow-up on some questions from his first interview.

Deputy Connelly has been employed by the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for over three years. Deputy Connelly is currently assigned to the Washington Township Substation on third watch.

I asked Deputy Connelly a series of general questions regarding the text messages in this investigation reported to be between him and Detective Michael Sollenberger. Deputy Connelly said he believes the text messages are authentic messages between himself and Detective Sollenberger and does not believe they were fabricated or made up by someone else. Deputy Connelly said based on the information he had and his memory the information he gave during his first interview was truthful.

I asked Deputy Connelly if he does recall text messages he had with Detective Sollenberger in which either he or Detective Sollenberger used racially derogatory terms for African Americans and Middle Eastern individuals and he answered, "Yes."

I reviewed with Deputy Connelly the text messages between Detective Sollenberger and myself that Ms. Dani Estridge provided Detective Cavender from when she downloaded the information from Detective Sollenberger's iPhone. Deputy Connelly said the text messages appeared to be from the training session he attended with Detective Sollenberger and me. Deputy Connelly said a group of the students including Detective Sollenberger, me, and himself ate lunch at El Rancho Grande.

I then asked Deputy Connelly about his text messages with Detective Sollenberger:

I told Deputy Connelly he did not remember the specifics of the conversation in his first interview and had said he thought it was a continuation from a spoken conversation he had with Detective Sollenberger. I asked if he recalled anything further. Deputy Connelly said he did not further recall the conversation.

I asked Deputy Connelly about the use of the term "half breed" in this conversation he had with Detective Sollenberger. Detective Connelly said this was a joking conversation in which "half breed" is referring to President Obama and the mixed race of his parents. Deputy Connelly said "half breed" in his response to Detective Sollenberger meant the President could not overcome the African American background from his parentage.

Deputy Connelly said his work performance at the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office has never been influenced, positively or negatively, by the race or ethnicity of anyone he has had dealings with. Deputy Connelly said his text messages with Detective Sollenberger were meant as jokes and bravado and not intended to become public.

Deputy Connelly said he did not have any further information regarding this investigation I ended the interview at 1427 hours.

Interview with Detective Michael Sollenberger

On Wednesday, January 14, 2015, at approximately 1530 hours, Detective Michael Sollenberger appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriffs Headquarters Building as a focus in an administrative investigation. Detective Sollenberger, his representative Mr. Mark Scranton, Detective Bryan Cavender and I were present for the interview. I reviewed the Policy/Waiver form and the Administrative Investigation Pre-Interview form with Detective Sollenberger. Detective Sollenberger said he understood the forms and signed both. Mr. Scranton and Detective Cavender witnessed his signature on the forms.

This was a second interview with Deputy Sollenberger to clarify and follow-up on some questions from his first interview.

Detective Sollenberger has been employed with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for eighteen years. Detective Sollenberger is currently assigned as a detective in the Inspectional Services Unit where he has been assigned for five years. I summarized the first interview with Detective Sollenberger by pointing out Detective Sollenberger said he did not recall the text messages that are the focus of this investigation and he agreed. I asked Detective Sollenberger if after the benefit of additional time, he was able to recall the text messages further or if recalled having engaged in the conversations. Detective Sollenberger said, "On the previous ones, the ones that, no." I asked Detective Sollenberger after reviewing the text messages if he believed these were copies of text messages between him and other persons from the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office. Detective Sollenberger said, "Uh, I mean having looked at them. I, I never, I guess denied that they weren't text messages between individuals and I. What I don't recall, or don't necessarily remember is the content of some of the text messages."

I asked Detective Sollenberger to review a series of text messages between himself and Deputy Joseph Connelly from January 29, 2013, beginning at 0716 hours. I asked Detective Sollenberger if that was a conversation he had with Deputy Connelly. Detective Sollenberger, after reviewing the texts said, "Yes, some of it here with, I, I'd assume talking with Ab, about Aby and Mary, so yeah."

I then asked Detective Sollenberger to review text messages between him and me from the same date and the same training in which we talked about going to lunch. Detective Sollenberger said he did not recall the training session where Deputy Abby Dudley, Deputy Connelly and I attended with Detective Sollenberger.

I asked Detective Sollenberger if recalled the following text conversation with Deputy Connelly:

Detective Sollenberger said he did not recall the conversation. I asked Detective Sollenberger if he thought this conversation did happen even though he did not recall it. Detective Sollenberger said, "I think there was a conversation between Joe Connelly and I. Um, as well as a conversation between you and I. Um, I, I just don't remember the specific content of it. Um." I asked Detective Sollenberger what the term "half breed" meant in the terms of the conversation. Detective Sollenberger said, "It goes in to talking about beer at Prickers." I asked Detective Sollenberger the part that talks about "half breed," what a "half breed" meant. He said, "Well I know what a half breed means. What people refer to them as." I asked what it was, Detective Sollenberger said, "It means that, somebody, one parent is black and one parent is white."

I asked Detective Sollenberger if he thought this was an actual conversation between him and Deputy Connelly. Detective Sollenberger said, "I think we can say that talking about lunch and stuff like that. I mean like I said in my previous conversation, or my previous interview, you know any of the stuff can be manipulated, changed, altered, in any form or fashion, you know. I don't remember when all of us went to training. I don't remember all of us going to lunch. Um, it, it appears to be a legitimate conversation, but I don't necessarily know if all of its legitimate." I asked Deputy Sollenberger, if Deputy Connelly told me he had the conversation with Detective Sollenberger and used the term "half breed" with him would Deputy Connelly be correct. Detective Sollenberger said, "I don't think so."

I then asked, "So, Joe (Connelly) earlier today when he said, 'yes, that is a conversation that Mike (Sollenberger) and I had,' lied to me?" Detective Sollenberger said, "I'm. Who, Joe lied to you? Oh, I don't know. I don't know what Joe said. What I'm telling you." I interrupted Detective Sollenberger saying, "What I'm telling you is Joe (Connelly) said you had that conversation with him." Detective Sollenberger said, "Ok, well I don't remember having that conversation with Joe."

When I questioned Detective Sollenberger further about Deputy Connelly's statements about the text conversations, and Detective Sollenberger's statements about Deputy Connelly being wrong, Detective Sollenberger said, "I, I, I don't remember sending any of this stuff. You know, it's been over two years since any of these conversations."

I summarized Detective Sollenberger's memory about the total text message documents by saying, "So of all this information that we have, you don't remember any of it. But if I can put it together and show you where your talking to Landis (Major Scott Landis) and then you talk to Tommy (Captain Thomas Flanders) on the same day at the same time about the same thing, you'd believe that happened, right?" Detective Sollenberger said, "Yeah. I, I'm saying, these. From looking at these, looking at this on, on face value, these are conversations that I've had between friends, co-workers, or whatever. But I don't necessarily agree exactly with all the content of it." I asked Detective Sollenberger what content he did not agree with. He said, "As I said, in my previous interview, the derogatory comments. This is all a ploy by my ex-wife because we are in a, in a heated custody battle. You know, and, and this was released, or brought to you guys' attention the week before my divorce trial starts. Before the custody battle starts."

I said to Detective Sollenberger, "So, to clarify your first interview. You believe these text messages, in some respects, to be authenticate, although you don't remember any of them. And the parts that can be verified as can be talking about specific things that apply to your job would be authenticate, but the part where you talk to Brian Lewis (Sergeant Lewis) about going to Boston's and stabbing a "coon" and listening to Hank Williams Jr. is inaccurate." Detective Sollenberger said, "Yes, 'cause I don't even like Hank Williams Jr. And I don't listen to Hank Williams Jr." I asked if it was inaccurate because Detective Sollenberger does not like Hank Williams Jr. He said, "I just think it's inaccurate, I mean I don't remember having that conversation with Brian Lewis." I asked if it was possible he had that conversation with Sergeant Lewis. Detective Sollenberger said, "I don't think so. I, why would I send Brian Lewis a text message saying 'I'm going to stab a coon?' I think that anything within these text messages can be altered, deleted, changed, destroyed. Like for example, apparently I texted, 'That Andy McCoy story made no sense, D-10 has four AD, AEDs so if you're the sixth car there is not one.' I have no idea what that's referring to. I, I, I have no idea what that is." I asked Detective Sollenberger if he thought someone made that up. He said, "I'm not saying somebody made it up. What I, what I'm explaining to you is, I don't recall these text conversations, you know. They were from over two years ago. I've had a lot go on in my life in the past two years, so trying to remember a text message about AEDs in Harrison Township I, I don't."

I asked Detective Sollenberger if anyone would make up a text message about Andy McCoy and AED' s in Harrison Township. Detective Sollenberger said, "No but if you take this (indicating the printed text messages) and scan this in and save it as a Word document you can go in and free type any text in there that you want." I asked Detective Sollenberger what text messages were made that way. He said, "Again, I said, this is, this is all brought to your guys' attention by my ex-wife. This, we are in the, the nastiest custody battle that, you know, anybody could ever imagine. You know, she, she has called and filed police reports against me. Um, you know they were all unfounded, you know. She's filed domestic violence against me, unfounded. She's called Mercer County Sheriff's Office and tried to file burglary reports against me, unfounded. She's called the Archdioceses of Cincinnati and tried to complain on me. She, she has been non-stop tormenting and harassing me, you know. This is not the first time that, you know, she has done anything like this. You know she got a, a, fire lieutenant who she was having an affair with fired from his job. You know it, its constant harassment from her."

I asked Detective Sollenberger if he knew Dani Estridge. He said he did. I asked if she held any ill will toward him and why. He said, "Oh yes she does. Well, because she's friends with Jenn. She doesn't like me." Detective Sollenberger continued, "She in fact testified against me to the Guardian Ad Litem report. You know, when it came in, you know for the Guardian Ad Litem, for the, for the uh, for the child custody."

I told Detective Sollenberger that Ms. Estridge provided cell phone files she took from his (Sollenberger's) phone which contained these text messages to us. I told Detective Sollenberger Ms. Estridge told us she did not fabricate any message or alter any file other than to convert them to a PDF file. Detective Sollenberger said, "Do I think she's lying? Yes. I do. Because throughout all the divorce hearings that I've had over two years, Jenn has lied on the stand numerous times about where this phone was. How she came in contact with this phone. In fact in our final divorce hearing, she testified that the phone was out of her possession for, like a couple months. You know, so anything, could have happened to it."

I asked Detective Sollenberger if he believed Ms. Estridge fabricated messages on his phone. Detective Sollenberger said, "If Dani was the one that said that she did, then she did." I asked, "That she did what?" Detective Sollenberger said, "I Dani is the one who extracted this information from the phone, then I say her and Jenn have conspired to fabricate this stuff."

I asked Detective Sollenberger what the term "mud shark," was and if he had heard it before. Detective Sollenberger said, "Yeah I've heard it before." I asked what it means and he said, "I already told you it's when like when one party's black and the other party is white." I asked Detective Sollenberger if that was a term he has used before and he said, "Not that I can recall." I asked Detective Sollenberger if the conversation he had with Sergeant Lewis about being at Boston's with Craig Stivers was all fabricated? He said, "No, I'm saying. I don't remember having a conversation with Brian Lewis about. Have I been to Boston's Bistro? Yes I have. Have I seen Brian there? Yes I have. Have I seen Craig Stivers there? Yes I have. But I don't remember that specific date, time, texting talking to Brian, doing whatever." I asked Detective Sollenberger if it was possible he had the conversation with Sergeant Lewis. He said, "I could of, but like I said with any of this. It could be altered, changed, deleted, manipulated."

I asked Detective Sollenberger about the conversations he had with Captain Flanders, if that was the same as the other text conversations and he did not recall any specifically. He said that was correct.

I asked Detective Sollenberger to review text message with Detective Walt Steele where the term "nig nog" was used. I asked Detective Sollenberger if he knew what that was referring to or if he heard the term before. He said he did not know what Detective Steele was referring to and did not believe he had heard the term before.

I asked Detective Sollenberger to review text messages reported to be between him and Captain Jeff Papanek. I asked if the messages appeared to be authenticate messages between the two of them. Detective Sollenberger said, "I mean it appears to be a conversation between Captain Papanek and I. It appears to be." I asked Detective Sollenberger if Ms. Estridge fabricated messages between him and Captain Flanders, Sergeant Lewis, Detective Daugherty, Deputy Horton and Deputy Connelly why would she not fabricate messages between him and other Sheriff's Office employees. Detective Sollenberger said, "Because, I believe that at the time of my separation, that my wife believed, and she doesn't know any different, and believed that I was working directly with Brian (Lewis), working directly with Tommy (Flanders). Joe (Connelly), testified in the Guardian Ad Litem report. Brad (Daugherty) and I have been friends forever, as well as Jayme Horton. I think she believed that those were people who were going to testify, or lend credibility during the divorce hearing. And I think that's why she targeted those individuals."

I asked about Sergeant Terry Ables, and why Ms. Sollenberger would not target him as well because he also worked in the Inspectional Services Unit with Detective Sollenberger. He said, "Well, I'm saying because I wasn't working with Terry (Ables) at the time when we split." Detective Sollenberger continued, "And I don't even, I worked with Terry (Ables) for a short time in here and I don't know if her and Terry (Ables) even ever met."

I asked about Rick Ward, who was a Detective in the Inspectional Services Unit with Sergeant Ables. He said, "I never worked with Rick (Ward) in here. And Rick wouldn't testify in the. He didn't testify in the Guardian Ad Litem report, or he wasn't going to testify in court." Detective Sollenberger said the Guardian Ad Litem report began in January of2014 when he first met with the guardian, and was completed sometime between April and June of2014. Detective Sollenberger said he did not have any further information regarding this investigation. I ended the interview at 1555 hours.

Interview with Detective Walter Steele

On Wednesday, January 14, 2015, at 1625 hours, Detective Walter Steele appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriffs Headquarters Building as a witness in an administrative investigation. Detective Steele, his representative Mr. Mark Scranton, Detective Bryan Cavender and I were present for the interview. I reviewed the Policy/Waiver form and the Administrative Investigation Pre-Interview form with Detective Steele. Detective Steele said he understood the forms and signed both. Mr. Scranton and Detective Cavender witnessed his signature on the forms.

Detective Steele has been employed by the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office for over seventeen years. Detective Steele is currently assigned to the Special Investigations Unit on second watch.

Detective Steele reviewed the text messages reported to be between him and Detective Sollenberger approximately 10 minutes before the interview.

Detective Steele agreed Detective Sollenberger's text messages appear green on the sheet on the right side of the page and his messages are light gray and on the left side of the page. I asked Detective Steele if the messages appear to be authentic text message between him and Detective Sollenberger. Detective Steele said, "Yeah, I mean it appears, um. Because we're talking about, there was a, um, his birthday party was at Jenn's house, and, um. And we're talking about uh, the ponds, and the boat, so it, it appears, I mean it's been awhile I can't say I remember these but it appears as a conversation between both of us."

I asked Detective Steele about the first text message in the series:

I asked Detective Steele what "nig Nog" meant in his text. Detective Steele said, "It means to me a friend." Detective Steele continued, "Mike, Mike's a friend of mine and that's what it looks like. It's, to me the, I can't see what the beginning part is, but it looks like in a response so, what I'm assuming is he called me what I would say friend, I called him friend back. So I, I think probably what I would think is, since I don't have the beginning part to say. I think I probably repeated back you know, he called me a friend, I called him a friend back."

I asked Detective Steele if that was a term he used regularly or just with Detective Sollenberger. He said, "No, I wouldn't say it's a term I use with him. Um someone, someone calls you something you call them something back, but what I take that as is, is friend. I mean I can't say. Cause I, that, that word isn't like in my normal vocabulary. You know that. To me, that isn't even a bad word, but I'm just saying I can't, I can't account for it because he may have said it to me and I just repeated it back to him. But I know that I don't have any bad feelings towards him, so I would just be calling him a, a friend back."

I asked Detective Steele if he has ever used the term "nig Nog," in a disparaging way. Detective Steele said he has not.

Detective Steele said he did not have any further information regarding this investigation. I ended the interview at 1634 hours.

Interview with Ms. Jennifer Sollenberger

On Monday, January 12, 2015, at approximately 1530 hours, Detective Tony Hudson and I (Detective Bryan Cavender) arrived at Ms. Jennifer Sollenberger's residence to copy Detective Sollenberger's personal iPhone. Ms. Sollenberger advised us that we could set up in the basement so she could smoke. Detective Hudson set up the Cellebrite machine to copy Detective Sollenberger's phone.

When I asked for the phone Ms. Sollenberger said that she did not have the phone, she was keeping it at a secure location. I informed her the reason I wanted to meet with her was to make a copy of the phone. Ms. Sollenberger stated that she did not trust anyone from the Sheriff's Office and wanted a third party to copy the phone. I attempted to explain to Ms. Sollenberger why it was important to have the original phone and why I need to make a copy. Ms. Sollenberger stated she understood but would not tum the phone over. Ms. Sollenberger attempted to open a file on her computer that contained the files from Detective Sollenberger's iPhone. Ms. Sollenberger was having difficulty opening the files. I explained to her that her friend Dannielle Estridge had already provided me with the files she was attempting to open. Detective Hudson and I concluded our conversation with Ms. Sollenberger and returned to headquarters.

Interview with Ms. Dannielle Estridge

On Tuesday, January 13, 2015, at approximately 1300 hours, Ms. Dannielle Estridge appeared at 345 West Second Street, Sheriff's Headquarters Building as a witness in an administrative investigation. Ms. Estridge and I (Detective Bryan Cavender) were present for the interview.

Ms. Estridge said she is a registered nurse, employed by Care Source. Ms.Estridge said she usually works from home by phone. I asked Estridge how she became involved with the text messages from Detective Sollenberger's personal iPhone. Ms. Estridge said she was contacted by Ms. Sollenberger, stating she found her son looking for an old iPhone that Detective Sollenberger had once used. Ms. Sollenberger informed Ms. Estridge her son was told by Detective Sollenberger, if he found the phone he would have it activated for him. Ms. Sollenberger wanted Ms. Estridge to look through the phone to see what was on the phone.

Ms. Estridge stated that she obtained that phone from Ms. Sollenberger, and on May 02, 2014 she used the W ondershare program to extract deleted files from the phone. Ms. Estridge stated while she was extracting the files from the iPhone she obtained from Ms. Sollenberger, she began to review the text messages on the phone. Ms. Estridge said while reviewing text messages she discovered several racially derogatory texts between Detective Sollenberger and other Sheriff Office employees. Ms. Estridge completed the extraction process and backed up the phone on an iTunes account. Ms. Estridge said that she also created backup files of the phone and placed them on a computer for Ms. Sollenberger.

I asked Ms. Estridge if she returned the phone to Ms. Sollenberger once she completed the extraction and backing the phone up on iTunes. Ms. Estridge said that she kept the phone at a secure location for a couple of months before returning to Ms. Sollenberger.

I asked Ms. Estridge if she was the one who assisted Ms. Sollenberger with contacting the NAACP concerning the text messages. Ms. Estridge stated it was a group discussion about what should be done with the text messages from Detective Sollenberger's personal phone. Ms. Estridge stated that she was present when Ms. Sollenberger was meeting with her attorney who advised Ms. Sollenberger if she had racially derogatory text messages take them to the NAACP.

I asked Ms. Estridge if she knew when Ms. Sollenberger provided the text messages to the NAACP, she thought it was sometime in August. Ms. Estridge said that she did not know why the NAACP's investigation took so long. I asked Ms. Estridge if Ms. Sollenberger was updated on the NAACP's investigation. Ms. Estridge said Ms. Sollenberger contacted her a month before the information was released to the public, stating Ms. Sollenberger was informed it was going to be released to the public much earlier than it actually was released.

Ms. Estridge also brought her computer to the interview with the iTunes file from Detective Sollenberger's personal iPhone. I contacted James Fisher from the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office Information and Technology section who provided an external hard drive to copy the files from Ms. Estridge's computer.

At approximately 1445 hours all of the files had been copied from Ms. Estridge's computer to the external hard drive and the interview was concluded.

After the interview I discovered that the audio recording device failed and the interview had not been recorded. I also was unable to open some of the files copied from Ms. Estridge's computer. I contacted Ms. Estridge and informed her of the difficulties and asked her if she would return and assist in retrieving the files and participate in another interview, she agreed.

Interview with Dannielle Estridge

On Friday, January 16, 2015, at approximately 1453 hours, Ms. Estridge returned to the 345 West Second Street, Sheriffs Headquarters Building for a second interview.

I reviewed the first interview with Ms. Estridge to ensure I recalled the information correctly. Ms. Estridge verified the content of the first interview. I asked Ms. Estridge if she knew Thomas Flanders, Brian Lewis, Jayme Horton, Brad Daugherty, or Brian Connelly. She stated that she did not know any them. I asked if she had any ill will toward any of them that would cause her to create or insert racially derogatory text messages. Ms. Estridge said she would not do that. Ms. Estridge said she is a registered nurse and would not jeopardize losing her license.

I asked Ms. Estridge if she had ever created any fake or "ghost" text messages, she stated that she has not and would not create fake text messages.

While the interview was being conducted, Ms. Estridge copied files she obtained from Michael Sollenberger's personal phone to an iPhone 4 that we provided her.

Sergeant Parin asked Ms. Estridge if she had ever heard the term "ghost messages" she stated that she had not. Sergeant Parin asked Ms. Estridge if she had programs that could create fake or ghost text, she said no.

Sergeant Parin asked Ms. Estridge if the phone we provided her with, to copy the files from Detective Sollenberger's personal iPhone was now an accurate representation of Michael Sollenberger's personal iPhone she copied on May 02, 2014. Ms. Estridge said the text and pictures are an accurate representation of Detective Sollenberger's phone. Ms. Estridge stated that the music and apps are held specifically on the computer it was synced with, so those items would not be on the phone we provided her to copy the files to.

Sergeant Parin asked Ms. Estridge if the deleted photos she was able to extract from Detective Sollenberger's personal iPhone, were on the phone she copied for us. She stated she did not think the deleted photos would be on the phone we provided her with.

The deleted photos and additional texts that were extracted by Ms. Estridge were on a flash drive she provided me with on January 12, 2014.

The interview was concluded at 1507 hours.

Additional Investigation

On Friday, January 15, 2014, Ms. Dani Estridge appeared at the Sheriff's Office Headquarters building and met with Detective Cavender and me.

Ms. Estridge brought her Mac Book Pro computer which she synced with the telephone Ms. Sollenberger gave her which belonged to Detective Sollenberger. Ms. Esteridge said she completed synching the telephone through iTunes on her computer to preserve the files for Ms. Sollenberger for the upcoming divorce on May 2, 2014. I provided Ms. Estridge with a Sheriff's Office iPhone 4, and asked her to restore the device with the synced files from Detective Sollenberger's iPhone. Ms. Estridge synced the files which show all of the text messages she provided in the PDF files. All of the messages point to the contact information for the individuals reported to be texting the information.

For instance there is a series of text messages between Detective Sollenberger and myself. I recalled many of the text messages upon seeing them and recall the incidents surrounding the text messages.

On Tuesday, January 20, 2015, Ms. Sollenberger and Ms. Estridge brought the iPhone Ms. Sollenberger reported as belonging to Detective Sollenberger to me. Ms. Sollenberger advised she would allow us to image the phone, but would not allow us to keep it. Detective Tony Hutson imaged the phone with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office Cellebrite phone imaging devices and software and made a copy of the files contained on the phone for forensic examination. After imaging the phone, it was returned to Ms. Sollenberger.

After imaging the phone, Detective Hutson provided a thumb drive with the imaged phone files to me. I reviewed an Excel file titled Apple 3GS 1-20-15 #1. I reviewed the "SMS Messages" tab. There are a total of 7,744 SMS message files between the dates of November 7, 2011, and February 1, 2013, which appear to be the dates Detective Sollenberger actively used this phone between.

On Tuesday, December 16, 2014, Ms. Sollenberger brought an iPhone to me and allowed Detective Hutson to image the phone. Ms. Sollenberger reported the phone was the phone which Detective Sollenberger used to send the text messages which she gave to the NAACP. Detective Hutson imaged the phone with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office Cellebrite phone imaging devices and software and made a copy of the files contained on the phone for forensic examination. After imaging the phone, it was returned to Ms. Sollenberger.

After imaging the phone, Detective Hutson provided a thumb drive with the imaged phone files to me. I reviewed an Excel file titled Report. I reviewed the "SMS Messages" tab. There are a total of 2,464 SMS message files between the dates of July 2, 2009, and November 6, 2011, which appears to be the dates Detective Sollenberger actively used this phone between. After reviewing these files it was obvious the text messages which are the focus of this investigation were not on the telephone. After re-contacting Ms. Sollenberger and contacting Ms. Estridge, in January of2015, Ms. Sollenberger realized she gave me Detective Sollenberger's first iPhone which he stopped using on November 6, 2011.

Conclusion of Fact

On Sunday, November 30, 2014, Sheriff Phil Plummer and Major Daryl Wilson met with Mr. Derrick Foward, President of the Dayton Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), at the Dayton offices of the NAACP. Mr. Foward informed Sheriff Plummer he had been given a series of text messages between Detective Michael Sollenberger and several other employees of the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office (Captain Thomas "Tommy" Flanders, Sergeant Brian Lewis, Detective Brad Daugherty, Deputy Jayme Horton and Deputy Joseph Connelly) which contained conversations of a racially derogatory nature. Mr. Foward explained he received the messages in August of 2014, from a complainant who wished to remain anonymous. Mr. Foward said the complainant wanted an investigation to be conducted.

Mr. Foward provided photocopies of the messages he felt needed investigated to Major Wilson on Tuesday, December 2, 2014. After reviewing the copied documents, it was immediately obvious the messages contained information only the individuals reported to be engaged in the conversations would know. It was also obvious there were a number of messages missing from the text conversations. It was also apparent the complainant who provided the messages to Mr. Foward was Detective Sollenberger's, estranged wife Jennifer Sollenberger.

On Monday, December 15, 2014, Mr. Foward provided copies of the five Portable Document Files (PDF) he was given by Ms. Sollenberger in August of2014. The PDF files contained a chronological stream of conversations between Detective Sollenberger and each of the other employees. These files provided a more complete and logical view of the text messages which gave further credibility to the authenticity to the text messages.

On Tuesday, December 16, 2014, Ms. Sollenberger appeared for an interview. Ms. Sollenberger admitted she found the iPhone belonging to Detective Sollenberger. Ms. Sollenberger said a friend of hers, Dani Estridge, synced the phone to a computer and used a program to convert the text message conversations on the phone to PDF files.

At the time Ms. Sollenberger appeared for her interview, she brought an iPhone she said was the phone Ms. Estridge found the text messages on. Detective Tony Hutson imaged the phone with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office Cellebrite phone imaging devices and software and made a copy of the files contained on the phone for forensic examination. Upon reviewing the phone files, I found the phone did not contain any of the text messages from this complaint.

Throughout the day on Thursday, December 18, 2014, Detective Cavender and I conducted individual interviews with Detective Daugherty, Deputy Horton, Sergeant Lewis and Deputy Connelly. Each employee agreed the text conversations were authentic, based on the specific information contained within or their memories of the events, although they did not specifically recall all of the content or conversations.

On Friday, December 19, 2014, Detective Cavender and I interviewed Captain Flanders. Captain Flanders admitted the document contained a lot of text messages only he and Detective Sollenberger could have had, and although he could not specifically recall the specific messages agreed many of them were authentic. However, Captain Flanders denied reading or sending any racially derogatory messages or cursing. Captain Flanders theorized during his interview that Ms. Sollenberger created the racially derogatory messages as a way of discrediting Detective Sollenberger during their divorce proceedings.

Captain Flanders provided a report from a polygraph examiner which he and his attorney, Mr. Doug Brannon contracted as evidence of his truthfulness. Captain Flanders also provided two partial transcripts from Ms. Sollenberger (one from a deposition before her divorce trial and on from her divorce trial) regarding contradictory statements she made about the iPhone and text messages in this investigation. Captain Flanders claimed the documents were proof of Ms. Sollenberger's un-truthfulness.

Captain Flanders further provided an e-mail from Mr. Jim Swauger of Digital Forensics with an opinion of the authenticity of the copied PDF files I provided to Captain Flanders with his Notice of Investigation. Mr. Swauger's opinion was:

Based on what I've seen so far, I can see no way to authenticate the messages. It is possible that the messages are a complete and accurate representation; however, it is equally possible that the produced messages have been modified, redacted, or even completely fabricated.

On Friday, December 19, 2014, Detective Cavender and I interviewed Detective Sollenberger. Detective Sollenberger said throughout his interview he could not remember any of the text messages due to the length of time since they were reportedly sent and received. Detective Sollenberger alleged his estranged wife altered and fabricated many of the text messages provided as a way of discrediting him before their divorce trial and child custody battle.

Following the interviews with the six employee focuses in this investigation, although four of the employees recalled parts of the text messages and believed them to be accurately reported, Detective Sollenberger and Captain Flanders adamantly denied participating in the racially derogatory messages and alleged they were fabricated. It was apparent further authentication of the messages was needed as proof for this investigation.

Between Monday December 19, 2014, and Monday, January 5, 2015, Detective Cavender and I made repeated attempts to contact Ms. Sollenberger to talk about the discrepancy between the text messages she provided the NAACP and the messages on the phone she provided to us. Ms. Sollenberger scheduled and canceled three different meetings between Tuesday, January 6, 2015, and Monday, January 12, 2015.

On Sunday, January 11, 2015, I contacted Ms. Dani Estridge by telephone, after Ms. Sollenberger provided me with her contact information. Ms. Estridge told me she synched and copied the iPhone which belonged to Detective Sollenberger on May 2, 2014, and produced the PDF files using a program she purchased. I explained to Ms. Estridge the phone Ms. Sollenberger brought me on December 16, 2014, did not contain any of the text messages from the PDF files and all of the text messages ended the day before (November 6, 2011) the earliest text message in the files. Ms. Estridge immediately explained she synced two different iPhones Ms. Sollenberger had which belonged to Detective Sollenberger.

While I spoke to her on the telephone, Ms. Estridge reviewed the iPhone sync and she found all ofthe files from this investigation starting on November 7, 2011. Ms. Estridge said she would meet with Detective Cavender on Tuesday, January 13, 2015, and provide copies of the files she made.

On Monday, January 12, 2015, Detectives Cavender and Hutson met with Ms. Sollenberger to image the other phone with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office Cellebrite phone imaging devices and software for forensic examination. Ms. Sollenberger did not provide access to the phone at that time.

On Tuesday, January 13, Detective Cavender received copies of the computer files Ms. Estridge copied from Detective Sollenberger's iPhone on May 2, 2014. Ms. Estridge also provided Detective Cavender with copies of the PDF files she created using software to copy text messages to text.

On Wednesday, January 14, 2015, I conducted second individual interviews with Deputy Horton, Deputy Connelly and Detective Sollenberger. Deputy Horton and Deputy Connelly both reiterated their belief the text messages between themselves and Detective Sollenberger were true and accurate. Detective Sollenberger again reported he could not recall any of the specific text messages. Detective Sollenberger further alleged Ms. Sollenberger and Ms. Estridge conspired to fabricate the derogatory text messages to discredit him.

On Friday, January 16, 2015, Ms. Estridge returned to my office with her laptop computer and restored a Sheriff's Office iPhone 4 with the back-up from Detective Sollenberger's phone. This placed all of the messages which are the focus of this investigation back onto an iPhone which shows the specific date and time each message was sent and received. The times and dates for the text messages are identical to those from the PDF files indicating the PDF files are authentic copies of the messages sent and received by Detective Sollenberger and not fabricated or altered.

On Tuesday, January 20, 2015, Ms. Sollenberger and Ms. Estridge appeared at my office with the iPhone Detective Sollenberger used between November 7, 2011, and February 1, 2013. Detective Hutson imaged the phone with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office Cellebrite phone imaging devices and software for forensic examination. Detective Hutson provided the files created to me. I reviewed the files and found they contained all of the text messages with time and date stamps logged by the phone's operating system (iPhone OS 6.1).

Based on the entirety of the information I received from Ms. Sollenberger and Ms. Estridge, the PDF files Mr. Foward provided to the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office are true and accurate messages sent between Detective Sollenberger and Detective Daugherty; Detective Sollenberger and Sergeant Lewis; Detective Sollenberger and Deputy Horton; Detective Sollenberger and Deputy Connelly; Detective Sollenberger and Captain Flanders.

Detective Daugherty received one text message out of 31 messages he received from Detective Sollenberger between the dates of September 20 and January 23, 2013, which contained a racially derogatory reference. Detective Sollenberger referred to Detective Brad Meeker of the Dayton Police Department as a "mud shark." Detective Daugherty merely received the message from Detective Sollenberger. Detective Daugherty did not acknowledge or respond to the message or reference made by Detective Sollenberger. This equates to receiving an unwanted telephone call, e-mail or text.

By not acknowledging or responding to the text, Detective Daugherty clearly did not participate in the racially derogatory message with Detective Sollenberger. Therefore, the allegation Detective Daugherty participated or sent racially derogatory text messages with Detective Sollenberger is declared unfounded.

Detective Sollenberger during this conversation referred to Detective Meeker as a "mud shark." "Mud shark" was defined by Deputy Connelly as a disparaging term used for a Caucasian woman who has sexual relations with an African American man. Detective Sollenberger's use of the term in the conversation, although in jest, did not reflect favorably on Detective Sollenberger or the Sheriff's Office when made public. Detective Sollenberger's use of the term "mud shark," when referring to Detective Meeker is declared improper conduct. Detective Sollenberger violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional conduct rules:

Rule 45
Ethical Conduct

Employees must always conduct themselves, both on and off duty, in a way that reflects favorably on the Sheriff's Office. Employees are forbidden from engaging in conduct that dishonors the Sheriff's Office, discredits the individual as a law enforcement employee, or impairs the efficient operation of the employee or the Sheriff's Office. Besides the preceding rules, all employees are accountable and responsible for the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics as a professional guideline.

Employees shall truthfully answer all questions, specifically directed and narrowly related to the scope of their employment and operations of the Sheriff Office, which may be asked of them. Employees shall be honest and shall not practice deceitfulness. Any attempts to hide or evade the truth or fact, no matter how slight, shall be grounds for discipline up to and including termination.

Sergeant Lewis participated in a conversation via a series of text messages with Detective Sollenberger on March 30, 2012, between 2049 and 1024 hours. Sergeant Lewis admitted during his interview the messages do not look good and do not reflect favorably on him due to the racially derogatory terms he and Detective Sollenberger used. Sergeant Lewis said the messages were meant in jest, and he was responding to Detective Sollenberger's bravado.

Sergeant Lewis responded to Detective Sollenberger's comment, "BTW the niggers are trying to take over Boston's," by sending, "Who left their gate!!!!!!! The (sic) don't serve Nog beer there." Although Sergeant Lewis explained he took the meaning of Detective Sollenberger's use of the word "niggers" to mean thugs and responded with "Nog," the term which Sergeant Lewis said he used to describe thugs; it is evident the term "Nog" was a specific reference to persons of color. Sergeant Lewis continued the conversation with Detective Sollenberger by sending the text, "I hope u (sic) packing," after Detective Sollenberger reported, "There r (sic) 4 of them at the bar," and then, "I know ask Craig when u (sic) see him. Plus three more walked in." Sergeant Lewis continued the conversation by asking Detective Sollenberger if he was "packing", meaning carrying a gun. Detective Sollenberger responded with bravado by saying, "I'm not I'll stab a coon as soon as the juke box slows down I'm playing hank (sic) Williams jr." Sergeant Lewis further responded saying, "Thataboy," and the final text of the conversation from Detective Sollenberger was, "I hate niggers that is all."

Sergeant Lewis's conduct in using the term, "Nog beer" as a response to Detective Sollenberger use of the word, "Niggers" to describe a group of people at a bar he was at. The term does not reflect favorably on Sergeant Lewis or the Sheriff's Office when made public. Sergeant Lewis' conduct is declared improper conduct. Sergeant Lewis violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional Conduct Rule:

Rule 45
Ethical Conduct

Employees must always conduct themselves, both on and off duty, in a way that reflects favorably on the Sheriff's Office. Employees are forbidden from engaging in conduct that dishonors the Sheriff's Office, discredits the individual as a law enforcement employee, or impairs the efficient operation of the employee or the Sheriff's Office. Besides the preceding rules, all employees are accountable and responsible for the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics as a professional guideline.

Employees shall truthfully answer all questions, specifically directed and narrowly related to the scope of their employment and operations of the Sheriff Office, which may be asked of them. Employees shall be honest and shall not practice deceitfulness. Any attempts to hide or evade the truth or fact, no matter how slight, shall be grounds for discipline up to and including termination.

Detective Sollenberger during this incident denied ever having this conversation to the point of implying Sergeant Lewis would be lying if he confirmed the message. Detective Sollenberger repeatedly said this conversation was untrue, not because of the terms "niggers," and "coons" he was reported as using, but because he does not like Hank Williams Jr. music. Detective Sollenberger accused his estranged wife and her friend of fabricating this series of text messages. This investigation shows the conversation between Sergeant Lewis and Detective Sollenberger did happen on the time and date reported as shown by Detective Sollenberger's iPhone. Additionally during his interviews, Detective Sollenberger purposely lied in an attempt to prevent the facts in this case from being revealed by saying Sergeant Lewis was not correct in verifying the messages.

Detective Sollenberger's conduct is declared improper conduct. Detective Sollenberger violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional Conduct rules:

Rule 45
Ethical Conduct

Employees must always conduct themselves, both on and off duty, in a way that reflects favorably on the Sheriff's Office. Employees are forbidden from engaging in conduct that dishonors the Sheriff's Office, discredits the individual as a law enforcement employee, or impairs the efficient operation of the employee or the Sheriff's Office. Besides the preceding rules, all employees are accountable and responsible for the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics as a professional guideline.

Employees shall truthfully answer all questions, specifically directed and narrowly related to the scope of their employment and operations of the Sheriff Office, which may be asked of them. Employees shall be honest and shall not practice deceitfulness. Any attempts to hide or evade the truth or fact, no matter how slight, shall be grounds for discipline up to and including termination.

Rule 12
Insubordination

Employees must promptly obey any lawful orders or directives of a supervisor. This includes orders or directives from a superior that an employee of the same or lesser rank relays.

Employees must truthfully answer all interview questions a supervisor or an Inspectional Services Unit investigator asks them during a job performance or an administrative investigation. Failure to answer interview questions truthfully is prima facie evidence of insubordination and is proper grounds for termination of employment.

Deputy Jayme Horton participated in a series of text message conversations with Detective Sollenberger between September 21, 2012, and January 29, 2013. Many of the 265 individual messages exchanged between the two were about their families and are not derogatory in nature. Deputy Horton sent three messages where he used the term "nigga" to describe a character on a television show as a tough guy. Deputy Horton also took one photograph of the feet of an inmate, who was African American, and sent it to Detective Sollenberger who replied, "Gross." Deputy Horton admitted he hears the terms on a daily basis while working, and has been called those terms from time to time by African American prisoners in court. Deputy Horton admitted his use of the words do not look favorably on him or the Sheriff's Office when made public and would not talk that way in a public setting. During his interview Deputy Horton apologized for the use of the words. Deputy Horton further said in his interview he has never treated anyone of any race or background any differently while working as a Deputy Sheriff for the citizens of Montgomery County.

Deputy Horton's actions in participating in racially derogatory conversations with Detective Sollenberger are declared improper conduct. Deputy Horton violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional Conduct Rule:

Rule 45
Ethical Conduct

Employees must always conduct themselves, both on and off duty, in a way that reflects favorably on the Sheriff's Office. Employees are forbidden from engaging in conduct that dishonors the Sheriff's Office, discredits the individual as a law enforcement employee, or impairs the efficient operation of the employee or the Sheriff's Office. Besides the preceding rules, all employees are accountable and responsible for the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics as a professional guideline.

Employees shall truthfully answer all questions, specifically directed and narrowly related to the scope of their employment and operations of the Sheriff Office, which may be asked of them. Employees shall be honest and shall not practice deceitfulness. Any attempts to hide or evade the truth or fact, no matter how slight, shall be grounds for discipline up to and including termination.

During his interviews when asked about the text messages between him and Deputy Horton, Detective Sollenberger said he could not remember the messages and alluded to the ease with which they could be altered or fabricated. This investigation shows Detective Sollenberger did engage in the racially derogatory messages with Deputy Horton particularly on two occasions, October 25, 2012,at 0755 hours, where he complains about having to" ... wait on Negroes at school," and then again on December 18, 2012, at 0756 hours, "It's way to early for my nigrometer to be at 96%." Detective Sollenberger also went on a rant to Deputy Horton on December 9, 2012, at 1444 hours, "Just because a nigger scammed the election and is pres. It does not give the G-damn right to shop at DLM." This is clearly a derogatory rant about African Americans shopping at Dorothy Lane Market following President Obama's re-election.

Detective Sollenberger's comments to Deputy Horton were racially derogatory and declared improper conduct. Detective Sollenberger violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional Conduct Rule:

Rule 45
Ethical Conduct

Employees must always conduct themselves, both on and off duty, in a way that reflects favorably on the Sheriff's Office. Employees are forbidden from engaging in conduct that dishonors the Sheriff's Office, discredits the individual as a law enforcement employee, or impairs the efficient operation of the employee or the Sheriff's Office. Besides the preceding rules, all employees are accountable and responsible for the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics as a professional guideline.

Employees shall truthfully answer all questions, specifically directed and narrowly related to the scope of their employment and operations of the Sheriff Office, which may be asked of them. Employees shall be honest and shall not practice deceitfulness. Any attempts to hide or evade the truth or fact, no matter how slight, shall be grounds for discipline up to and including termination.

Deputy Connelly participated in a series of text message conversations with Detective Sollenberger between the dates of September 20, 2012, and January 30, 2013, where a total of 722 messages were exchanged during the two. Deputy Connelly in his interviews explained he and Detective Sollenberger talked and associated a lot during the time because Detective Sollenberger was having some marital problems and Deputy Connely was going through a divorce. Deputy Connelly said the majority of the text messages reflect two guys joking back and forth about wives, girlfriends, politics and going out. Deputy Connelly described many of the conversations as being bravado or one-upmanship, each trying to make a more outrageous comment than the other. For instance on October 31, 2012, Detective Sollenberger said he needed a, " ... shovel and bag of lime," when Ms. Sollenberger over filled the bathtub and flooded the basement and Deputy Connely responded saying," ... My family has 120 acres in Indy ... "

During his interview Deputy Connelly admitted he participated in six comments which when viewed public do not reflect favorably on him and are not a representation of his work for the citizens of Montgomery County as a Deputy Sheriff. Deputy Connelly apologized for his comments during the interview.

Deputy Connelly's actions in participating in a total of six conversations of a racially derogatory nature are declared improper conduct. Deputy Connelly violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional Conduct Rule:

Rule 45
Ethical Conduct

Employees must always conduct themselves, both on and off duty, in a way that reflects favorably on the Sheriff's Office. Employees are forbidden from engaging in conduct that dishonors the Sheriff's Office, discredits the individual as a law enforcement employee, or impairs the efficient operation of the employee or the Sheriff's Office. Besides the preceding rules, all employees are accountable and responsible for the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics as a professional guideline.

Employees shall truthfully answer all questions, specifically directed and narrowly related to the scope of their employment and operations of the Sheriff Office, which may be asked of them. Employees shall be honest and shall not practice deceitfulness. Any attempts to hide or evade the truth or fact, no matter how slight, shall be grounds for discipline up to and including termination.

Detective Sollenberger during his interviews denied any memory of the text messages and claimed they were altered or fabricated by Ms. Soolenberger. Detective Sollenberger further alleged Deputy Connelly was being un-truthful by saying the conversations did occur. This investigation clearly shows Detective Sollenberger participated in the derogatory comments between himself and Deputy Connelly. Not only did Detective Sollenberger engage in conversations which dishonors him and his work at the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office, he repeatedly lied during his interviews about the messages with Deputy Connelly and accused Deputy Connelly of lying.

Detective Sollenberger's conduct is declared improper conduct. Detective Sollenberger violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional Conduct Rule:

Rule 12
Insubordination

Employees must promptly obey any lawful orders or directives of a supervisor. This includes orders or directives from a superior that an employee of the same or lesser rank relays.

Employees must truthfully answer all interview questions a supervisor or an Inspectional Services Unit investigator asks them during a job performance or an administrative investigation. Failure to answer interview questions truthfully is prima facie evidence of insubordination and is proper grounds for termination of employment.

Captain Flanders, for the majority of the time of the text message conversations being investigated, was Detective Sollenberger's Sergeant in the Inspectional Services Unit. From November 7, 2011 to January 31, 2013, Captain Flanders and Detective Sollenberger exchanged over 3,200 text messages while on and off duty. Captain Flanders and Detective Sollenberger had 29 conversations of a racially derogatory nature identified by Mr. Foward and confirmed through this investigation in-which they actively participated.

Captain Flander' s actions in participating in 29 racially derogatory messages over the course of fourteen months with Detective Sollenberger are declared improper conduct. Captain Flanders violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional Conduct Rule:

Rule 45
Ethical Conduct

Employees must always conduct themselves, both on and off duty, in a way that reflects favorably on the Sheriff's Office. Employees are forbidden from engaging in conduct that dishonors the Sheriff's Office, discredits the individual as a law enforcement employee, or impairs the efficient operation of the employee or the Sheriff's Office. Besides the preceding rules, all employees are accountable and responsible for the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics as a professional guideline.

Employees shall truthfully answer all questions, specifically directed and narrowly related to the scope of their employment and operations of the Sheriff Office, which may be asked of them. Employees shall be honest and shall not practice deceitfulness. Any attempts to hide or evade the truth or fact, no matter how slight, shall be grounds for discipline up to and including termination.

Detective Sollenberger's actions in participating in 29 racially derogatory messages over the course of fourteen months with Captain Flanders are declared improper conduct. Detective Sollenberger violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional Conduct Rule:

Rule 45
Ethical Conduct

Employees must always conduct themselves, both on and off duty, in a way that reflects favorably on the Sheriff's Office. Employees are forbidden from engaging in conduct that dishonors the Sheriff's Office, discredits the individual as a law enforcement employee, or impairs the efficient operation of the employee or the Sheriff's Office. Besides the preceding rules, all employees are accountable and responsible for the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics as a professional guideline.

Employees shall truthfully answer all questions, specifically directed and narrowly related to the scope of their employment and operations of the Sheriff Office, which may be asked of them. Employees shall be honest and shall not practice deceitfulness. Any attempts to hide or evade the truth or fact, no matter how slight, shall be grounds for discipline up to and including termination.

Throughout the course of his interview, Captain Flanders repeatedly pointed out individual text messages and swore he did not send them or had not seen the response to them. Captain Flanders alleged Ms. Sollenberger fabricated and inserted whole messages or portions of messages to discredit him and Detective Sollenberger. Captain Flanders, with the assistance of his attorney Mr. Brannon, further went to the extent of contracting R. L. Emmons to conduct a polygraph examination of proof that he did not participate in the text conversations. This examination was constructed by Mr. Brannon and Captain Flanders and was not reviewed by any independent Sheriff's Office employee.

The evidence obtained from Detective Sollenberger's phone shows Captain Flanders did participate in and send the derogatory messages attributed to him in this investigation which he claimed were fabricated by Ms. Sollenberger. Captain Flanders conduct in purposely lying during an internal investigation interview and attempting to mislead the investigation are declared improper conduct. Captain Flanders violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional Conduct Rule:

Rule 12
Insubordination

Employees must promptly obey any lawful orders or directives of a supervisor. This includes orders or directives from a superior that an employee of the same or lesser rank relays.

Employees must truthfully answer all interview questions a supervisor or an Inspectional Services Unit investigator asks them during a job performance or an administrative investigation. Failure to answer interview questions truthfully is prima facie evidence of insubordination and is proper grounds for termination of employment.

On Wednesday, December 10, 2014, Captain Flanders turned his Sheriff's Office issued iPhone and iPad over to me. Captain Flanders restored the devices to factory settings deleting all files from the work devices in the process. When asked why he turn in his issued iPhone and iPad without the work files he had on them he advised he was merely turning them in as they were issued to him so they could be re-issued immediately.

In restoring the iPhone and iPad to factory setting and deleting the files Captain Flanders prevented the ability of Sheriff's Office employees to review the project and work files he had contained on the devices. Captain Flanders' actions are declared improper conduct. Captain Flanders violated the following Sheriff's Office Professional Conduct Rule:

Rule 44
Computer Equipment, Software, and Network Systems

The Sheriff's Office's use of computer software complies with software vendors' specific licensing agreements. The Sheriff's Office does not allow or condone "Computer Software Piracy." Computer Software Piracy is the unlawful duplication of software without specific approval from the software vendor or is contrary to the licensing agreement. Employees committing Computer Software Piracy are subject to disciplinary measures.

Internet and Intranet connections are provided for business purposes and business related activities. Employees are expected to conduct themselves on these networks in a professional manner. Acceptable activities include, but are not limited to, communication with other governmental agencies and private entities engaged in activities related to law enforcement and the retrieval of information from the Internet related to professional pursuits. (See the "General Management and Administration" chapter in the General Orders Manual).

Employees must never add, alter, copy, delete, install, or download data files, software applications, or programs onto any agency owned computer without proper authorization from the Director of Information Technology. (See the General Orders Manual chapter on "General Management and Administration").

Sergeant David Parin #198

January 21, 2015

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ISU-14-067.pdf11.73 MB
2015 CV 00693 foreclosure.pdf3.95 MB
2015 CV 02639 complaint with jury demand.pdf36.96 KB